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In certain parts of the world, Thalassemia is common. It’s a type of genetic anemia. I am originally from the beaches of sunny Italy. Of course, I live in Canada, but my anemia followed me there.

I just made an Iron Buddha Bowl. My own combination, though I regret that I have not invented the Buddha Bowl in general.

I soaked green lentils and black beans overnight. Then I cooked them. So high in iron and protein! Which we’re not supposed to have in our blood!

I made some quinoa. Also way better than rice in terms of iron.

I popped in raw broccoli (which could have more iron but it needs veg, and it’s what I had).

And I threw in an avocado and sprinkled cashews on top.

This is a bigggggg meal, depending on how much ingredients you add. I am trying not to eat so frequently, since I’ve been starving for a few days in my transition to veganism from being vegetarian. As a vegan, you can get away with eating a bit more, but I really filled my bowl.
 

The dead Man

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I have the opposite worry about iron. I'm taking a vegan multi which contains 12mg iron, which seems like a lot to be taking as a supplement on top of a diet rich in beans and greens. If I can find a better inexpensive way to keep my overall mineral levels up, (nuts are way too expensive in our financial circumstances) I might ditch the tablets and stick to B12 and D supplements. That Buddha bowl does sound rather delicious!
 

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I've always called these Poke bowls but I don't know if there is an official distinction. Maybe its a West Coast thing.

I don't always make it the same way but this is a good recipe. and hey - they call it a budda bowl too.


I had a variation plugged into Cronometer already so incase anyone is interested this is a pretty high calorie, high fat, and high protein meal.

800 calories
47 grams of protein
52 grams of carbs
and 57 grams of fat. You can cut out some of the fat and calories by using low fat or just less dressing. also I add both sesame seeds and slivered almonds. You probably shouldn't do both. but I am actually trying to gain weight.

Lots of vitamins and minerals too. Almost 10mg of iron (over 100% of the RDA), too. Over 100% of omega 3 too.
 
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fakei

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I think I’m just used to denser foods. I’m realizing I need to eat more as a vegan
Originally understood that but was now at doubt. From what I heard over the years fats are more caloric than carbs and proteins, they are also what causes the feeling of satiety and dairy is a major source of it. One trick is to replace it with oils like olive oil. The problem is that for a healthy diet it seems the ratio omega 6 to omega 3 should be 4:1 or less. For that reason some experts recomend to consume more flax seeds, kale, etc...and avoid oils. Peanut butter can also be a replacement as far as protein and fats go but most contain trans fats besides being a processed food and I imagine the omega 6 issue remains.
Whole grains also seem to cause more satiety than refined ones maybe due to their fiber content. Potatoes can also be a good option if a person is feeling malnourished or without drive. They are not high in protein but since they are also low in calories they can be consumed in amounts large enough to constitute a good source of protein.
 
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David3

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I think I’m just used to denser foods. I’m realizing I need to eat more as a vegan
.
Maybe go for the peanut butter sandwiches on whole grain bread? About 340 calories, very filling, and about 17 grams of protein (2 tablespoons of natural peanut butter + 2 slices of whole wheat bread).
.
 
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Lou

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Peanut butter can also be a replacement as far as protein and fats go but most contain trans fats besides being a processed food and I imagine the omega 6 issue remains.

Well, I suppose all food is processed. You pull a carrot out of the ground and that IS a process. Oatmeal goes thru about 6 processes before you cook it. lately, I have seen people using the phrase highly processed vs minimally processed to help differentiate. The idea is that highly processed food is one where something has been taken away or something has been added. Like white flour has had the bran removed.

The peanut butter I buy is processed in the sense that the nuts were ground. but nothing has been added or subtracted. Although I know if you buy Jiff it has had sugar and salt added. there is plenty of brands that are just peanuts. Some stores have grinders right in the store where you can grind your own. Or you can use a food processor at home.

But yes PB has omega 6s. but I don't think it has any trans fats. And the rest of a vegan's diet is so low in Omega 6, i don't think its an issue.

IMHO peanut butter is a great way for vegans to get protein and calories.
 

David3

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Peanut butter can also be a replacement as far as protein and fats go but most contain trans fats besides being a processed food and I imagine the omega 6 issue remains.
.
Even the ultra-processed "Jif" peanut butter brand contains very little trans fat (essentially 0 grams per 1 tablespoon): Jif® | Jif Creamy Peanut Butter

Suggestion: By including links to the nutrition content of foods, we can avoid accidentally bashing healthy foods.
.
 

fakei

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Well, I suppose all food is processed. You pull a carrot out of the ground and that IS a process. Oatmeal goes thru about 6 processes before you cook it. lately, I have seen people using the phrase highly processed vs minimally processed to help differentiate. The idea is that highly processed food is one where something has been taken away or something has been added. Like white flour has had the bran removed.

The peanut butter I buy is processed in the sense that the nuts were ground. but nothing has been added or subtracted. Although I know if you buy Jiff it has had sugar and salt added. there is plenty of brands that are just peanuts. Some stores have grinders right in the store where you can grind your own. Or you can use a food processor at home.

But yes PB has omega 6s. but I don't think it has any trans fats. And the rest of a vegan's diet is so low in Omega 6, i don't think its an issue.

IMHO peanut butter is a great way for vegans to get protein and calories.

The initial arguments are a bit misleading, for instance, carrot jam would be a processed food, carrot is not. And there is a ddifference between a cooking process that may take place at home because the person is in control. There was a TV show called Miami Vice where one of the characters who was a vegetarian asked the other if he felt good about the mistery meat in a hot dog, I think you can say the same for all processed food. And to exemplify it, once when I used to consume olive oil told a vegan friend that only used the ones that claim to be virgin and obtained by mechanical proccess only. The person told me she had some inside knowledge on the field and it was no guaranteed that it was that way. Maybe the person was wrong, but who knows, it is a mystery oil anyway.

Another example was soy milk. There used to be a dietary system called macrobiotics back in the days. There was an expert who told me to boil soy milk with a strip of kombu. I did it with two brands one remained same the other turned into a strange mixture that looked very artificial.

About peanut butter, in my country food labbels must discriminate trans fat and most brands sold in large retailers have trans fats plus sugar. There is only one I found in big retailers which claims to be 100% peanuts (probably there are more in health stores) but didn't feel good in the long run, there is something definetly artificial about it.

Nevertheless each one is free to eat what he likes.
 

fakei

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Even the ultra-processed "Jif" peanut butter brand contains very little trans fat (essentially 0 grams per 1 tablespoon): Jif® | Jif Creamy Peanut Butter

Suggestion: By including links to the nutrition content of foods, we can avoid accidentally bashing healthy foods.
.
Sorry but trans fat is not considered healthy. You may be okay with the amount that brand contains, I didn't specify any amount only said many brands contain trans fat.
 

David3

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Sorry but trans fat is not considered healthy. You may be okay with the amount that brand contains, I didn't specify any amount only said many brands contain trans fat.
.
Please re-read my post, and see the link. Jif (ultra-processed) peanut butter contains 0 trans fat per 1 tablespoon.
.
 
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fakei

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Please re-read my post, and see the link. Jif (ultra-processed) peanut butter contains 0 trans fat per 1 tablespoon.
.


It seems the use of transfats was banned by the FDA recently in the US so I guess as far as the US goes the statement I made with respect to that is no longer valid.
 
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Lou

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But even before that, the labeling law in the US allows companies to round down. So let's say a product like your fake butter spay listed O trans fat per serving (About 10 spritzes). . It might contain 0.4 grams of trans fat. And if you were to put on like 3 servings (30 spritzes) of fake butter on your toast you would be getting over 1 gram of trans fat. But that was zen. This is tao.

But this is all moot on several counts.
• " a U.S. Department of Agriculture analysis of 13 brands of peanut butter found that the amount of partially hydrogenated oil was so small that trans-fat levels weren’t even detectable."
-https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2010/03/q-a-does-peanut-butter-contain-trans-fat/index.htm

• many peanut butters don't add any oil to them. (or sugar, or salt). that's all I buy.

• peanuts by themselves have no transfat.

• Artificial trans fats are banned in the U.S. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ruled in 2015 that artificial trans fats were unsafe to eat and gave food-makers three years to eliminate them from the food supply, with a deadline of June 18, 2018.
-https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/us-bans-artificial-trans-fats/

Bottom line: enjoy your peanut butter. "About 80 percent of its fat is the healthful, mono- and polyunsaturated kind."

 
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fakei

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But even before that, the labeling law in the US allows companies to round down. So let's say a product like your fake butter spay listed O trans fat per serving (About 10 spritzes). . It might contain 0.4 grams of trans fat. And if you were to put on like 3 servings (30 spritzes) of fake butter on your toast you would be getting over 1 gram of trans fat. But that was zen. This is tao.

But this is all moot on several counts.
• " a U.S. Department of Agriculture analysis of 13 brands of peanut butter found that the amount of partially hydrogenated oil was so small that trans-fat levels weren’t even detectable."
-https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2010/03/q-a-does-peanut-butter-contain-trans-fat/index.htm

• many peanut butters don't add any oil to them. (or sugar, or salt). that's all I buy.

• peanuts by themselves have no transfat.

• Artificial trans fats are banned in the U.S. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ruled in 2015 that artificial trans fats were unsafe to eat and gave food-makers three years to eliminate them from the food supply, with a deadline of June 18, 2018.
-https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/us-bans-artificial-trans-fats/

Bottom line: enjoy your peanut butter. "About 80 percent of its fat is the healthful, mono- and polyunsaturated kind."

I'm realizing there are cultural differences when it comes to food as we don't have, for instance, a culture of consuming peanut butter in my country and there aren't so many varieties around here.