HeyThere

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Mussels are not sentient. Would you have a problem with someone eating them and still calling themselves vegan? Sure, technically they are animals, but I'm more concerned with ethics than specifics. They have minimal to no affect on the environment when harvesting. My morals and standards still completely aline with veganism. I just don't see any reason to abstain. Mussels offer a great source for b12. They are also very healthy. I've watched many videos on the reasons not to, they don't make any good points. Unnatural vegan made a great video on this.
 

Jamie in Chile

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No, I would not have a problem with someone eating them and still calling themselves vegan but it seems that things like this don't cut it for being defined as (a strict) vegan. Veganism is based on not using any animal product rather than whether or not some animal products can be considered immoral.

One issue could be that the catching of mussles may lead to other things getting killed in the process. But if that's not true, it's probably a (relatively) ethical food to eat.

The other question is how sure you can be that mussels aren't sentient or whether they have some spiritual value. I actually went on a beach holiday where all the restaurants were mostly fish and seafood one month after converting to a vegan diet and I was still transitioning. I decided not to eat any of it because of this question of uncertainty about what is sentient and what isn't and how you know for sure, and how it's better to give the benefit of the doubt.

I haven't eaten any seafood since the first month of being mostly vegan. I have never really thought about this a lot since then.

I do think some types of seafood are at the very least much less immoral than meat and fish, but not sure it's completely 100% clean conscience either.
 

Sally

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I wouldn't eat mussels or any other seafood. I sometimes wonder if we shouldn't eat anything that doesn't fall off a plant. It seems wrong to kill a plant so we can dig it up and eat its roots. However, I'm not a supervegan or whatever it would be yet. We could probably live perfectly healthily on berries, fruits and seeds, after all that is what beans, etc, are. Most of my eating is done from routine or boredom, I know I eat more than I need. Perhaps we ought to go back to essential food and listen to what our bodies are really asking for and provide it in a pure form, ie, if you want salt then have a lick of salt, not what our mood fancies which would be a bag of crisps or a plate of mussels.
 

FatDadUK

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I was always confused about this issue in the past but watching the film Earthlings really clarified it for me. Just because they are not cuddly, furry or 'intelligent' by our reckoning, they are still living animals which cause no real harm and as such they should be left to find their own way in this world. Also, the amounts of sewage that may be filtered through these poor animals from our polluted seas and oceans makes me less willing to put them into my own body anyway. I was a huge shellfish lover but Earthlings allowed me to put that little bone of contention to bed in my own mind and remove any confusion. :)
 

HeyThere

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No, I would not have a problem with someone eating them and still calling themselves vegan but it seems that things like this don't cut it for being defined as (a strict) vegan. Veganism is based on not using any animal product rather than whether or not some animal products can be considered immoral.

One issue could be that the catching of mussles may lead to other things getting killed in the process. But if that's not true, it's probably a (relatively) ethical food to eat.

The other question is how sure you can be that mussels aren't sentient or whether they have some spiritual value. I actually went on a beach holiday where all the restaurants were mostly fish and seafood one month after converting to a vegan diet and I was still transitioning. I decided not to eat any of it because of this question of uncertainty about what is sentient and what isn't and how you know for sure, and how it's better to give the benefit of the doubt.

I haven't eaten any seafood since the first month of being mostly vegan. I have never really thought about this a lot since then.


I do think some types of seafood are at the very least much less immoral than meat and fish, but not sure it's completely 100% clean conscience either.
Hey, thanks for your comment. I know that technically, I wouldn't be vegan. Bycatch is something I am not certain about, but pesticides often hurt/kill animals and insects in order to grow our land food. Collateral damage is always there. Unless I intentionally cause damage, I don't see a problem. There's another article that talks about this and is really interesting. > https://sentientist.org/2013/05/20/the-ethical-case-for-eating-oysters-and-mussels/
As far as spirituality, I don't believe in that stuff.

Thanks so much again and have a nice day.:)
 
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HeyThere

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I was always confused about this issue in the past but watching the film Earthlings really clarified it for me. Just because they are not cuddly, furry or 'intelligent' by our reckoning, they are still living animals which cause no real harm and as such they should be left to find their own way in this world. Also, the amounts of sewage that may be filtered through these poor animals from our polluted seas and oceans makes me less willing to put them into my own body anyway. I was a huge shellfish lover but Earthlings allowed me to put that little bone of contention to bed in my own mind and remove any confusion. :)
Hi, thanks for the reply. "Just because they are not cuddly, furry or 'intelligent' by our reckoning, they are still living animals which cause no real harm and as such they should be left to find their own way in this world." I could say the same about a plant. I won't abstain from plants, because the arguments that they can feel pain are REALLY weak.
I haven't watched Earthlings yet. Frankly, I think I've seen enough gore from the animal product industry to know I want nothing to do with it. Maybe someday, but not for a long time.

Again, thanks.;)