Should i give up?

Hrodrik

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Hello!

I have been a vegetarian for about 8 months.
Still eating eggs, because of some digestive problems. Really hate it.
The fact is that my body can't tolerate any kind of beans, legumes.
I tried all the methods of soaking, cooking, sprouting, and so on, but nothing helps.

Because of my digestive problems, I no longer eat gluten, dairy, sugar, and recently stopping oats too.
I was followed up with a vegan nutritionist, which helped me with good probiotics, and some foods that I could try.
Probiotics doesn't seem to change it all.

I live in a country that is very hard to find Tofu and similar, and also very expensive.
Not an option.
Peanut butter, doesn't agree with me as well.

I don't get the right amount of proteins, unless I consider eggs.

And I love beans so much, that it's been a torture to avoid it.
Beans gives me headaches, constante nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, some brain fog, and really interferes in my working routine.

Maybe it's a case of intolerance, allergie...I don't know.
All that I know is that I did not have it in the past.

I'm so sad about everybody telling me to give up veganism.
"It is not for you."
"You got so skinny after this crazyness."
"You gonna get sick."

But After I had my mind open to the animal cause, and also health, I feel that it's impossible for me to get back eating meat again.

I just don't know what to do.
 
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amberfunk

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Can you eat avocados? Quinoa has a decent amount of protein as do flax seeds. Nutritional yeast also has protein. There's also almonds, pistasios, cashews and other nuts that are not peanuts. You can also eat rice with veggies.
 

Hrodrik

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Can you eat avocados? Quinoa has a decent amount of protein as do flax seeds. Nutritional yeast also has protein. There's also almonds, pistasios, cashews and other nuts that are not peanuts. You can also eat rice with veggies.
Avocado is one fruit that I have to try again now.
I was a long time without, because it did gave me some reactions.
I have re-introduced coconut, and it is fine.

Quinoa in my country, is both expensive and hard to find, unfortunately.

Yeah, flax seeds, chia seeds, almonds, rice, sweet potatoes are basically what I can eat and don't feel bad.
I was having oats too, but I thought that would be good to cut, to see what happens.

Thanks for answering.
 

Jamie in Chile

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This is a very difficult situation.

Can you source eggs from a very small, ethical operation or someone's backyard hens. Although vegans would not strictly agree with this (so would not be supported by most posters here and you would not be vegan) I hope no-one minds me suggesting it? The ethical concerns might be much less, if you find a place you can investigate? Or would you still hate the eggs for more fundamental ethical reasons, or even the taste? That feels like a last resort, though. There may be a better option to try first.

You probably can get enough total protein without eating meat, dairy, eggs or legumes. I am not certain of that, and it will vary by person, but I suspect that is true. You just need to chose the vegetables and grains with highest % protein. Mushrooms are high in protein. Need for high protein is sometimes exaggerated.

You could also experiment with other types of beans (have you tried peas and chick peas) or a very small amount of beans mixed with other foods: but perhaps you've tried this already and it doesn't work for you.

According to vegan nutriionist Jack Norris, The most important thing to be aware of regarding protein in vegan diets is that you need to get enough of the amino acid lysine. This is especially true if you don't eat legumes.

"the RDA for lysine is more important than for protein. If you meet lysine requirements on a vegan diet, you will most likely meet protein requirements.

Per serving, legumes and seitan are the foods highest in the amino acid lysine. Tofu, tempeh, soy meats, lentils, and seitan are the highest, followed by other legume foods. Quinoa, amaranth, pistachios, and pumpkin seeds are also decent sources of lysine."

http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein
 

Hrodrik

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Thank you for the great answer.

I live in a big city, and unfortunately there is no small producers.
Yeah, I would like to quit eggs for ethical reasons and even the taste.
I don't like the idea.
I got stuck with it, hoping to get better for legumes someday, so I could quit it for good.

I agree with you about the overestimated quantity of protein that the world is always telling us to get. In the past, I had that belive (especially in my times of gym) that I should get as much protein as I could, and it still would be little. But now I know is not like that.
I am just worried about a good amount for the health.

Other legumes, like chickpeas an lentils are actually much worse.
I usually get nauseous and so bad for days.

I'll definatly research about the amount of aminoacids, like you suggested.
I have already read about it, and it could be a start.

Thank you again.
This is a very difficult situation.

Can you source eggs from a very small, ethical operation or someone's backyard hens. Although vegans would not strictly agree with this (so would not be supported by most posters here and you would not be vegan) I hope no-one minds me suggesting it? The ethical concerns might be much less, if you find a place you can investigate? Or would you still hate the eggs for more fundamental ethical reasons, or even the taste? That feels like a last resort, though. There may be a better option to try first.

You probably can get enough total protein without eating meat, dairy, eggs or legumes. I am not certain of that, and it will vary by person, but I suspect that is true. You just need to chose the vegetables and grains with highest % protein. Mushrooms are high in protein. Need for high protein is sometimes exaggerated.

You could also experiment with other types of beans (have you tried peas and chick peas) or a very small amount of beans mixed with other foods: but perhaps you've tried this already and it doesn't work for you.

According to vegan nutriionist Jack Norris, The most important thing to be aware of regarding protein in vegan diets is that you need to get enough of the amino acid lysine. This is especially true if you don't eat legumes.

"the RDA for lysine is more important than for protein. If you meet lysine requirements on a vegan diet, you will most likely meet protein requirements.

Per serving, legumes and seitan are the foods highest in the amino acid lysine. Tofu, tempeh, soy meats, lentils, and seitan are the highest, followed by other legume foods. Quinoa, amaranth, pistachios, and pumpkin seeds are also decent sources of lysine."

http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein
 

Jamie in Chile

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It looks like small egg producers and other legumes are out then. So your key may be to try a diet without either legumes or animal products. I don't know for sure, but I suspect it's doable. Just do some research on sources of lysine you can eat. Alternative buy lysine as a supplement. If not available locally, try international shipping.

At some point if a solution is just too expensive you may have to do it anyway. If one expensive food (quinoa perhaps) or supplement is the key to lysine and therefore the key to a healthy and ethical diet it may be worth finding the money from somwhere. Good luck.
 
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Jamie in Chile

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Legumes are also one of the sources of calcium, and calcium tends to be low on a vegan diet. Consider planning to get the RDA of calcium, or at least getting some other sources, like some green veg I think has calcium, and almonds do, or milk with added calcium, or a calcium supplement.
 
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Hrodrik

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Great Jamie!

I'll consider it all.
Thank you so much for the help.
 

broadthinking

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Hello @Hrodrik!

I am not a doctor. This is only my opinion but if you are having trouble digesting so many foods, I would say this is not a vegan issue but an overall health issue and would definitely urge you to go your doctor and seek help!
You're right that it could be an allergy, it could be stress-related, it could a problem with your gut-flora, but whetever it is you won't know til you consult with your doctor and so I definitely think should seek help. Even if you go back to eating meat tomorrow and feel good, not being able to eat any beans or legumes could indicate a problem in your gut that needs addressing.

I wish you luck!

p.s. By the sound of things you have already explored the world of probiotics, but I'll say this just in case, there is a big difference in the quality of probiotics. I currently take a powder form that becomes active when mixed with water, previously I took capsules that needed to be kept in the fridge. My local chemist said these are less effective as time goes by even when kept in the fridge and that it is better to take the powder form. Also there needs to be literally billions of bacteria in them in order to make a difference in someone who has gut problems, someone taking probiotics for maintenance doesn't need so much so cheaper more common probiotics often don't contain so many or such a variety of bacteria.
 
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Hrodrik

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Hello @Hrodrik!

I am not a doctor. This is only my opinion but if you are having trouble digesting so many foods, I would say this is not a vegan issue but an overall health issue and would definitely urge you to go your doctor and seek help!
You're right that it could be an allergy, it could be stress-related, it could a problem with your gut-flora, but whetever it is you won't know til you consult with your doctor and so I definitely think should seek help. Even if you go back to eating meat tomorrow and feel good, not being able to eat any beans or legumes could indicate a problem in your gut that needs addressing.

I wish you luck!

p.s. By the sound of things you have already explored the world of probiotics, but I'll say this just in case, there is a big difference in the quality of probiotics. I currently take a powder form that becomes active when mixed with water, previously I took capsules that needed to be kept in the fridge. My local chemist said these are less effective as time goes by even when kept in the fridge and that it is better to take the powder form. Also there needs to be literally billions of bacteria in them in order to make a difference in someone who has gut problems, someone taking probiotics for maintenance doesn't need so much so cheaper more common probiotics often don't contain so many or such a variety of bacteria.
hello @broadthinking!

thank you very much for the presence
Nowadays I am trying to understand my health alone, because I've been to so many doctors, and none of them really helped me. I was a bit tired.

But I have good news. I believe I may be very close to a solution.
I have been able to eat beans in a moderate amount for the last two weeks, and I did not feel so bad. I would say that I felt only 10% of what I felt when I tried.

The only other thing I did was take oatmeal from my diet, and used L-Glutamine powder, about 5g a day.
I've never felt bad about oats, but I decided to try it, because it might be a bit like wheat. And from there, I was able to feed myself better.

Two days ago, I tried to reintroduce the oats, and I kept eating beans. And it all came back. I felt everything coming back again.
So now I'll just cut it off forever, and see how my body reacts.

I also made sauerkraut, and I'm consuming it as a source of probiotics. So far so good.

I'm really hopeful.

Thanks for the support.
 
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veganwoman

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Hey
I'm in the same boat. I have trouble with a lot of foods too. Wish I could help.I can eat soybeans and that's it. no other beans. I can have nuts though.
 
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Hrodrik

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Hey
I'm in the same boat. I have trouble with a lot of foods too. Wish I could help.I can eat soybeans and that's it. no other beans. I can have nuts though.
Hello!

I got a huge improvement in the last months.
Here is what I did:

-I started to eat my homemade sauerkraut. At least 1 tb with lunch or dinner;
-L-Glutamine powder. 3 to 5g a day. To repair my intestine walls;
-Tried so many types of beans. And realised that I don't have reaction to white beans and split peas. Lentils and chickpeas are like poison to me;
-I quit oats. From time to time I try to reintroduce, to see if my body agrees now. But somehow, it was worsening me;
-Avoid at all costs gluten and sugar. Wait a couple of months to try it again, in small amounts;
-No garlic. I spent months eating food only with salt and parsley. Now I'm trying onions, and it's going well;
-Find the kind of greens that your body can digest. I don't agree with collards.

I think everybody is different. But it's worth to keep trying.
I hope you get better.

If need to talk, just text that I'll do my best to answer.

Good luck!
 
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