Vegan pet foods

FredVegrox

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I'm a vegan. I'm NOT speciest at all. I did NOT know that about their cat food, I sent a message about their dog food because I'm part of their affiliate program, but after finding out about this I will quit their affiliate program
What do you have against Wild Earth's cat food (which does not even exist yet)?
Nobody is obliged to a single company. We are consumers if we are still in this civilization, we still make our choices, and it can be according to conscience. I would think choosing what would involve the least harm to living beings would be the most desirable, certainly if there is still good health with that, for us and those we choose for. Fortunately there is vegan dog food and vegan cat food that is good for their health with the needed nutrients. If there wasn't, lab meat would be a second choice, though much lower in desirability. I would never ever choose lab meat for myself, in any case.
 
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FredVegrox

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There are really bad things for pets in pet food using slaughtered animal parts, anyway. But just the ethics of getting an animal so that you are part of the demand for the slaughtered animal parts is to be morally questioned. Would slaughtered dog and cat parts be acceptable to use as pet food for any kind of pet? Why not, but other animals slaughtered with parts used for pet food is? That is speciesist. We are not called to be speciesist with our compassion. Speciesists are people who fail to extend empathy towards animals, even some animals with keeping other animals distinct, even though animals, too, are clearly sentient, sensitive creatures who have the same basic desires for companionship, a chance to live a normal life, and freedom from pain.
 

Lou

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Full disclosure. I don't have a cat and although I sometimes take care of other people's cats I just feed them whatever is in the cupboard. (and clean the litter box). And I don't even like cats.
But I know here at the Vegan Forum there has been a lot of discussion about vegan cat food.
I was pleasantly surprised to see in my NewsFeeder an article about Vegan Cat Food from an unlikely place. The Wall Street Journal.

 
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FredVegrox

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Full disclosure. I don't have a cat and although I sometimes take care of other people's cats I just feed them whatever is in the cupboard. (and clean the litter box). And I don't even like cats.
But I know here at the Vegan Forum there has been a lot of discussion about vegan cat food.
I was pleasantly surprised to see in my NewsFeeder an article about Vegan Cat Food from an unlikely place. The Wall Street Journal.

That is really alright. I don't have a cat either. I think it is important to take care of rescues, it seems to me that it is questionable to have any other animals. So a rescued cat is one thing. But cats have a predatory nature. For one to get a cat and call themselves vegan at that same time makes a conflict of meaning, as it is known that cats would kill small animals. To feed cats animal meat meant for pets will mean though that they get meat of animals that are not such a kind that they will ever catch themselves. That isn't natural meat for them. The meat that is left for them is not good quality anyway. It would not be worse to get plant-based food meant for cats, with nutrients they need put in it including taurine. That is the way to be consistent as a vegan. Natural predators fill a niche, where there is not another limiting factor to control a population that would grow excessively. Such predators would be fewer than populations of animals from which they catch individuals. Cats might be in that niche if there is not another controlling factor, for animals they can catch. But there would not be so many cats for that. Cats should not be continually bred, which they are for pet stores. That should not be supported. There is no other way of cats getting meat that is justified while there is quality plant-based food for cats. This should then be with cats that are rescued, and not supporting the breeding of cats that happens with getting any from a pet store. I am not in a position to care for a rescued animal, if I would be, there are other animals that might be rescued too, not just cats. So it is not good to pay for meat from animals that are slaughtered, in any case.
 
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nobody

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To feed cats animal meat meant for pets will mean though that they get meat of animals that are not such a kind that they will ever catch themselves. That isn't natural meat for them. The meat that is left for them is not good quality anyway. It would not be worse to get plant-based food meant for cats, with nutrients they need put in it including taurine. That is the way to be consistent as a vegan.
I think the lower quality meat and other animal tissues in cat food are better for cats' health than vegan pet food. Farm animals are not natural food for our cats' distant Afrcan wildcat ancestors, but these animals have been dining on our table scraps for about the past 10,000 years at least so they are somewhat adapted to eating farm animal parts. As far as just adding in what they need, such as taurine, it isn't that simple:

Cats have an absolute requirement for the nutrients taurine and arachadonic acid that are found naturally only in animal products, with one exception: a type of seaweed that contains arachadonate. Taurine can be chemically synthesized (although the process is so environmentally harsh that all synthetic taurine used in the U.S. is imported from China). These additives can be used to make a diet that is chemically complete. However, natural sources of taurine and arachadonic acid contain many other amino acids, enzymes, co-factors, and other complex nutrients that may also be important for the cat’s overall health. Science has shown us that whole-food derived nutrients are, in almost all cases, far superior and healthy than synthetic versions. For instance, ascorbic acid is the active ingredient in Vitamin C. However, natural Vitamin C contains many other components, including rutin, bioflavonoids, and other co-factors.