Sproutskies

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Hey guys,
Just found out that I have a thyroid problem (as a guy in late 20s) which could have been apart of a negative side effect from a medication. I want to do everything in my power to regain my health as a rich Vegan Diet boasts many success stories of people recovering from an illness or even just gaining more energy, feeling better about their choices.. As someone who has been addicted to meat for my whole life... it's becoming more apparent that my body is started to reject eating animal proteins based on the way that I feel afterwards.

Started Juicing yesterday for all meals and made some Vegan nachos just now that tasted pretty good! Want to stay on track and stay disciplined if any urges come up to break the diet.

Questions:

- What natural foods (aka not protein powder) do you enjoy that would provide enough protein for someone who is an athlete/muscle recovery?

- Have you found a brand of vegetable protein powder that tastes ok and is not 3-6x the price of whey?

- How do you like to keep your vegan diet affordable and tasty?

- How do you make sure to get all the nutrients that your body needs?

Hit me with whatever you got! Open to learning more.
 
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Lou

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- What natural foods (aka not protein powder) do you enjoy that would provide enough protein for someone who is an athlete/muscle recovery?

I don't like this question. almost all foods have protein. and if you eat enough calories you are going to get enough protein. You don't really need any supplements. I get most of my protein from legumes: soy milk, beans, lentils, and peas. Some from grains: rice, breakfast cereal, oatmeal. Nuts. Seeds.


- Have you found a brand of vegetable protein powder that tastes ok and is not 3-6x the price of whey?
Right now I'm using Vega vanilla protein and greens. It's ok.

- How do you like to keep your vegan diet affordable and tasty?
I used to buy a lot of stuff in the bulk food aisles. The bulk food aisles are closed buy you can still get good prices on dry rice, beans, lentils, peas, seeds, and nuts.

- How do you make sure to get all the nutrients that your body needs?

I take a daily multivitamin and omega 3. And I use Cronometer to track my nutrients.
 
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thinman

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There are Yoga exercises for the thyroid, hold each pose everyday for 10 minutes, shoulder stand, plough and fish.
 
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Emma JC

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welcome to the forum and congrats on your decision to take control of your health

Juicing is nice but you miss out on the fibre from the vegetables and fruits so if you have a blender or food processor you may wish to consider blending your smoothies or veggie drinks. Dr Greger has a great video on his favorite beverage.


Emma JC
 
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Lou

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Does that hat make Dr. Gregar silly?
Anyone try that drink?
 

silva

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Strongly suggest the Daily Dozen which is list of food types and serving size to eat for a days nutrition

I'd also suggest the book Whole, by Colin Campbell
How not to Die by Dr Greger
The Idiots guide to a Plant Based Diet, by Julieanna Hever RD

I buy 2 pound bags of dry beans for $2.69 at Aldi. Lentils, nuts and seeds. Produce both conventional and organic when priced right
I think it's quite similar to changing your diet to any other type--like from the typical American to Lebanese or other culture. They're both very good, but you're going to struggle in the beginning, and won't feel normal for a while. Or even think of it like learning a new language- the more you immerse yourself in it, and surround yourself with other people who are fluent in it the easier you will learn!

The one think you DO need is a b12 supplement.

I take b12 and an algae DHA. DHA is only found in fish oil and algae (where fish get theirs). Our bodies have to convert omega fatty acids 3-6-9 found in nuts, seeds like flax, chia and hemp, but not everyone can make the accessible version and it is reduced with age. I found I feel better taking like 250 of DHA a day.
 

silva

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Does that hat make Dr. Gregar silly?
Anyone try that drink?
He is kinda silly! :weird:
I did make that V12 when I got my Vitamix! Didn't have the chlorella, and well, I can't follow recipes for crap, but pretty close!
Yeah, I got it down. The real secret to smoothies I find is having things blended well.
I prefer ginger to peppers any day, in fact I believe I have a bit of an allergy to capsacium
 
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thinman

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I juice carrots, beets, sweet potato, ginger, celery and green apple. Then use the juice in a smoothie blending seeds, greens, banana and nut butters. Juicers rule! we've juiced for decades. All the enzymes without all that fibre.

Juicing TIP. . .

I insert a recyclable produce bag into the pulp bin, it's like a nut bag but much stronger. You can squeeze the bag after juicing into a bowl real hard all over to get even more juice. The bag will collect some very fine pulp that will likely get into your juice coz of the bigger holes than a nut bag.
 
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Sproutskies

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- What natural foods (aka not protein powder) do you enjoy that would provide enough protein for someone who is an athlete/muscle recovery?

I don't like this question. almost all foods have protein. and if you eat enough calories you are going to get enough protein. You don't really need any supplements. I get most of my protein from legumes: soy milk, beans, lentils, and peas. Some from grains: rice, breakfast cereal, oatmeal. Nuts. Seeds.

Maybe should have worded it to say like a weight lifter's diet w 1-2g per lb of lean muscle mass. Just found a great deal for a veg protein powder on amazon but it looks like it would take very large quantities of raw "protein rich" foods to get to those higher macros.

The one think you DO need is a b12 supplement.

I take b12 and an algae DHA. DHA is only found in fish oil and algae (where fish get theirs). Our bodies have to convert omega fatty acids 3-6-9 found in nuts, seeds like flax, chia and hemp, but not everyone can make the accessible version and it is reduced with age. I found I feel better taking like 250 of DHA a day.

Cool thanks!

I juice carrots, beets, sweet potato, ginger, celery and green apple. Then use the juice in a smoothie blending seeds, greens, banana and nut butters. Juicers rule! we've juiced for decades. All the enzymes without all that fibre.

Juicing TIP. . .

I insert a recyclable produce bag into the pulp bin, it's like a nut bag but much stronger. You can squeeze the bag after juicing into a bowl real hard all over to get even more juice. The bag will collect some very fine pulp that will likely get into your juice coz of the bigger holes than a nut bag.

Have noticed that the old Juice machine is not a great way to get everything out/seemed way too wasteful. Have to try out the juice bag method.
 
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David3

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Hey guys,
Just found out that I have a thyroid problem (as a guy in late 20s) which could have been apart of a negative side effect from a medication. I want to do everything in my power to regain my health as a rich Vegan Diet boasts many success stories of people recovering from an illness or even just gaining more energy, feeling better about their choices.. As someone who has been addicted to meat for my whole life... it's becoming more apparent that my body is started to reject eating animal proteins based on the way that I feel afterwards.

Started Juicing yesterday for all meals and made some Vegan nachos just now that tasted pretty good! Want to stay on track and stay disciplined if any urges come up to break the diet.

Questions:

- What natural foods (aka not protein powder) do you enjoy that would provide enough protein for someone who is an athlete/muscle recovery?

- Have you found a brand of vegetable protein powder that tastes ok and is not 3-6x the price of whey?

- How do you like to keep your vegan diet affordable and tasty?

- How do you make sure to get all the nutrients that your body needs?

Hit me with whatever you got! Open to learning more.


Hi Sproutskies, and welcome to the forum.

Important: Because you are addressing an existing health problem, it might be wise to plan your diet with the help of a Registered Dietitian. Your physician can refer you to one, or you can find a local RD through the website of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Eatright.org - Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics . Just click on the red "Find An Expert" button in the upper right of their website.

The American Council on Exercise - one of the largest certification organizations for personal fitness trainers - has stated that properly-planned vegetarian diets are suitable for athletes: Are vegetarian diets safe?

Protein-rich whole foods include beans, lentils, nuts, and seeds. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics - the world's largest association of Registered Dietitians - has published this webpage about vegetarian protein for building muscle: Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet

There are some pretty inexpensive vegetable protein powders, though I'm not sure how they compare to whey protein. The "Orgain" brand is sold at Costco: https://www.costco.com/protein.html?dietary-features=vegan&refine=ads_f141501_ntk_cs%3A%22Vegan%22

Vegan diets are less expensive than meat-centered diets, unless you are buying a lot of vegan specialty products. Vegan diets obtain protein from beans and lentils - these foods are always less than expensive than meat.

Vegan diets can be made tasty by including healthy, spicy, and savory sauces - probably the same sauces that you already enjoy. Salsa, mustard, Asian sweet/sour sauces, balsamic vinegar, pasta sauce, hummus, ketchup, and even some steak sauces (A-1 Steak Sauce is vegan). Spicy vegetables (like pickles, sundried tomatoes, and artichoke hearts) are good for putting on sandwiches and pizza. Certain healthy, fat-rich plant foods provide energy and satiety - avocados, olives, nut butters, nuts, and seeds.

Kaiser Permanente (one of the largest health insurance companies in the United States) has published a plant-based nutrition guide: http://www.kphealthyme.com/documents/plant_based_diet_e.aspx . Their guide includes easy and tasty meal ideas.

Vegan diets are healthy. There are certain nutrients that do require attention on a vegan diet - vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, and iodine. Other nutrients of possible concern are iron and omega-3 fatty acids. With the exceptions of calcium and omega-3 fatty acids, these nutrients-of-concern can be addressed by taking a vegan multivitamin - these can be bought inexpensively on Amazon: Amazon.com: Deva Vegan Multivitamin & Mineral Supplement One Daily Tablets, 90 Count (2 Pack): Health & Personal Care or at your local health food store.

Calcium is available from calcium-fortified plant milks (soy milk, almond milk, oat milk), calcium-set tofu, calcium-fortified orange juice, and certain green vegetables (kale, collards, turnip greens, broccoli): Calcium in the Vegan Diet -- The Vegetarian Resource Group . All of these should be available at your local supermarket.

Omega-3 DHA supplements are available through Amazon. Not all vegans take these, although it appears to be advisable.
 
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thinman

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Have noticed that the old Juice machine is not a great way to get everything out/seemed way too wasteful. Have to try out the juice bag method.

You have to squeeze real hard, great hand strength exercise. You can compost the pulp or add it to your smoothie or bake with it.

There's a juicer that has a 2000lb pressure press.
 

Emma JC

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if you are looking for a vegan body builder who has a simple whole food plant-based diet you could follow Simnett Nutrition on YouTube - Derek does a great job of presenting a balanced vegan diet imo

Emma JC
 
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thinman

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Maybe should have worded it to say like a weight lifter's diet w 1-2g per lb of lean muscle mass. Just found a great deal for a veg protein powder on amazon but it looks like it would take very large quantities of raw "protein rich" foods to get to those higher macros.

It's not recommended to use a lot of protein powder, mainly coz of the heavy metals etc. 1 scoop a day should be ok. Some brands are worse than others.

 

Sproutskies

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Hi Sproutskies, and welcome to the forum.

Important: Because you are addressing an existing health problem, it might be wise to plan your diet with the help of a Registered Dietitian. Your physician can refer you to one, or you can find a local RD through the website of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Eatright.org - Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics . Just click on the red "Find An Expert" button in the upper right of their website.

The American Council on Exercise - one of the largest certification organizations for personal fitness trainers - has stated that properly-planned vegetarian diets are suitable for athletes: Are vegetarian diets safe?

Protein-rich whole foods include beans, lentils, nuts, and seeds. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics - the world's largest association of Registered Dietitians - has published this webpage about vegetarian protein for building muscle: Building Muscle on a Vegetarian Diet

There are some pretty inexpensive vegetable protein powders, though I'm not sure how they compare to whey protein. The "Orgain" brand is sold at Costco: https://www.costco.com/protein.html?dietary-features=vegan&refine=ads_f141501_ntk_cs%3A%22Vegan%22

Vegan diets are less expensive than meat-centered diets, unless you are buying a lot of vegan specialty products. Vegan diets obtain protein from beans and lentils - these foods are always less than expensive than meat.

Vegan diets can be made tasty by including healthy, spicy, and savory sauces - probably the same sauces that you already enjoy. Salsa, mustard, Asian sweet/sour sauces, balsamic vinegar, pasta sauce, hummus, ketchup, and even some steak sauces (A-1 Steak Sauce is vegan). Spicy vegetables (like pickles, sundried tomatoes, and artichoke hearts) are good for putting on sandwiches and pizza. Certain healthy, fat-rich plant foods provide energy and satiety - avocados, olives, nut butters, nuts, and seeds.

Kaiser Permanente (one of the largest health insurance companies in the United States) has published a plant-based nutrition guide: http://www.kphealthyme.com/documents/plant_based_diet_e.aspx . Their guide includes easy and tasty meal ideas.

Vegan diets are healthy. There are certain nutrients that do require attention on a vegan diet - vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, and iodine. Other nutrients of possible concern are iron and omega-3 fatty acids. With the exceptions of calcium and omega-3 fatty acids, these nutrients-of-concern can be addressed by taking a vegan multivitamin - these can be bought inexpensively on Amazon: Amazon.com: Deva Vegan Multivitamin & Mineral Supplement One Daily Tablets, 90 Count (2 Pack): Health & Personal Care or at your local health food store.

Calcium is available from calcium-fortified plant milks (soy milk, almond milk, oat milk), calcium-set tofu, calcium-fortified orange juice, and certain green vegetables (kale, collards, turnip greens, broccoli): Calcium in the Vegan Diet -- The Vegetarian Resource Group . All of these should be available at your local supermarket.

Omega-3 DHA supplements are available through Amazon. Not all vegans take these, although it appears to be advisable.

Thanks for typing all of this out!

After about a week of reading labels and looking up nutrition content of many vegetables, beans, vegan/plant based foods.. it's slowly becoming easier to keep track of what's going into my body. The number one thing to look at is that I'm not overdoing the fiber which can prevent absorption of the thyroid meds.

Need to invest in supplements and find a good source of Omega-3s that don't have the trace amounts of heavy metals/anything toxic. Have studied nutrition as a hobby over many years although there are always different trains of thought on what the body needs, activity level, optimal diet based on what ancestors ate, ...

if you are looking for a vegan body builder who has a simple whole food plant-based diet you could follow Simnett Nutrition on YouTube - Derek does a great job of presenting a balanced vegan diet imo

Emma JC

Ty! Started following Simnett Nutrition. Seems like he has a good understanding on how to transition from being a meat eater + avoiding relapse. 🥒🥕🏋️‍♂️
 
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poivron

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Have you looked at Dr. John McDougall's web site? His (vegan and oil-free) diet is good for curing a lot of diseases, including, I believe, thyroid problems. It's also inexpensive and easy to stick to. See:


"Nini Girl" and "Plantiful Kiki" on YouTube also have a lot of useful information, recipes, etc.
 

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Make sure your iodine levels are good and neither too low or too high. I believe iodine only has a narrow safety window. I'm not a medical practitioner so I won't give specific advice but vegan diets can be low in iodine. I add a little iodized salt to two of my daily meals but if you want low sodium, you may have to supplement. As you have a specific condition, you should talk the options through with a qualified professional, such as your doctor. Kelp is not a good idea because there is a lot of variation in quantity.
 
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Sproutskies

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Have you looked at Dr. John McDougall's web site? His (vegan and oil-free) diet is good for curing a lot of diseases, including, I believe, thyroid problems. It's also inexpensive and easy to stick to.

Have seen him around Ytube, never checked out his stuff. Will take a look!

Make sure your iodine levels are good and neither too low or too high. I believe iodine only has a narrow safety window. I'm not a medical practitioner so I won't give specific advice but vegan diets can be low in iodine. I add a little iodized salt to two of my daily meals but if you want low sodium, you may have to supplement. As you have a specific condition, you should talk the options through with a qualified professional, such as your doctor. Kelp is not a good idea because there is a lot of variation in quantity.

Especially with Thyroid stuff iodine balance is very important. My new Endocrinologist did say to switch to iodized salt instead of the kosher. Need to get a blood test soon also.

Have found it easy to get zinc, iron, b12s, and calcium from certain vegetables and the occasional enriched food. The main thing is getting the a higher quantity and these things don't seem like a problem. Surprised at how people write off the Vegan diet claiming you will not get all nutrients. Using Cronometer: Track nutrition & count calories to make sure to get the daily intake numbers on everything.

So far so good and never thought I would feel this amazing🌈
 
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Sproutskies

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It's been one month on the diet and have nutrition/budget dialed in. Only really supplementing on Selenium, Omegas, and Zinc. Getting tons of B vitamins and iron from mixing the variety of foods. Here is a view of what the levels look like today (sodium is the only thing that needs to be cut back):

Screen Shot 2020-08-30 at 1.17.31 AM.png
 
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silva

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It's been one month on the diet and have nutrition/budget dialed in. Only really supplementing on Selenium, Omegas, and Zinc. Getting tons of B vitamins and iron from mixing the variety of foods. Here is a view of what the levels look like today (sodium is the only thing that needs to be cut back):

View attachment 22261
That's impressive--but how the heck do you do all that and not get at least 100% of C? That doesn't even seem possible to me! A half cup broccoli has 70% all by itself!