Why would one lose taste for animal foods?

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I think most people were meant to eat some meat (how else did we get b12?), but why is it the less you eat of it over time the less you want it? (at least in my case)
I have b12 deficiency as mentioned in another post and I am afraid of pills and shots so right now I make an exception and eat an egg, and a little 100% pasture raised beef from a local farm. I think it helps when the meat is humanely raised and grass fed. For awhile I was pescatarian until I had bad salmon. After that, I got really tired of standing at the fishmonger counter at Whole Foods in fear of what I might get. I had bad chicken once and that was the end of chicken, and in the last couple of years even eggs are starting to bother me. I don't eat the white, only the yolk because the white tastes like chicken to me. I haven't so far had bad beef from this local farm so it is what I will tolerate until I get over the fear of the shot. I just want to know why this has happened... why have I lost taste for meat, something I ate all my life ? I have digestion issues so maybe this is the cause? I cut out cheese after my digestion issues, something else I used to love, and now cheese is unappealing to me. I find it hard to sleep after eating the beef but I have added a lot of sauerkraut to my diet for probiotics and from what I've read that can cause trouble sleeping so it could be that as well. Anyway sorry for the rambling, I guess my general question is why the less animal foods you eat the less you want it when in fact I think we were meant to eat it? I start to imagine things like burning flesh and fat over the grill and this meat not going through my body well. These things never happened in my childhood or early 20's. I sometimes wonder if my anxiety contributes to it all.
 

Lou

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Based on the little I know about you I would guess its more of a psychological /emotional thing and not a biology thing.
 

silva

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You're not going to find many here who feel we were 'meant' to eat meat. B12 is a bacteria, and while it gets complicated on the delivery system through eating flesh, it was mostly a product of untreated water, and unwashed veggies. Most animals raised for food get it supplemented in their feed.
Our minds can produce so many feelings that don't necessarily correlate with what our bodies really need. You remembering the things that corresponded to sickness naturally gives you an adverse feeling towards them. Sometimes that happens quickly, and we can blame things that may not even be the triggers, other times we balk and keep eating them until we can't ignore it anymore. I continued to eat avocado, with violent reactions, before I had to realize I was allergic!

Anyway, humans are omnivores. Opportunistic eaters. You can't disregard the idea that we evolved eating what was available, and what provided the most calories. It angers me when people argue that people were meant to eat meat because our ancestors did--how about focusing on all the other activities our ancestors did? Like run from predators, climb trees, clear brush, fashion shelters, spend their lives in quest of making food, obtaining water, having shelter and watch for danger. That's it. That is very very very different physiological lifestyle than any one in modern society ever lives. In other words, they need a very very very different nutritional profile. I mean really, they even had a working appendix!

Our brains can twist everything around. I don't have food obsessions, but I certainly other issues most people dont' even think twice about, and act as normal. I think everyone has something they struggle with.

Look at the reality of how your response compares to the possible danger. Your fear is causing you poor health--what would B12 supplements do to you to cause harm? It is the same B12 you get in animals,the same B12 that you body and brain needs to function properly.Most doctors don't even run the proper tests, so you may be facing more harm than you even realize. Practicing doctors do not study nutrition as part of their medical training. You'll need to listen to the ones that do.


Please start by getting the b12 shots. Add food from all the categories. Start with some oatmeat and berries for breakfast. Try a new nut,like walnuts. Have a salad
 

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I think most people were meant to eat some meat (how else did we get b12?), but why is it the less you eat of it over time the less you want it? (at least in my case)
I have b12 deficiency as mentioned in another post and I am afraid of pills and shots so right now I make an exception and eat an egg, and a little 100% pasture raised beef from a local farm. I think it helps when the meat is humanely raised and grass fed. For awhile I was pescatarian until I had bad salmon. After that, I got really tired of standing at the fishmonger counter at Whole Foods in fear of what I might get. I had bad chicken once and that was the end of chicken, and in the last couple of years even eggs are starting to bother me. I don't eat the white, only the yolk because the white tastes like chicken to me. I haven't so far had bad beef from this local farm so it is what I will tolerate until I get over the fear of the shot. I just want to know why this has happened... why have I lost taste for meat, something I ate all my life ? I have digestion issues so maybe this is the cause? I cut out cheese after my digestion issues, something else I used to love, and now cheese is unappealing to me. I find it hard to sleep after eating the beef but I have added a lot of sauerkraut to my diet for probiotics and from what I've read that can cause trouble sleeping so it could be that as well. Anyway sorry for the rambling, I guess my general question is why the less animal foods you eat the less you want it when in fact I think we were meant to eat it? I start to imagine things like burning flesh and fat over the grill and this meat not going through my body well. These things never happened in my childhood or early 20's. I sometimes wonder if my anxiety contributes to it all.
You can get B12 from things like yeast.
 

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I guess my general question is why the less animal foods you eat the less you want it when in fact I think we were meant to eat it?
There could be several explanations, but one that I like is this:

The less animal foods you eat, the stronger your belief grows that you can live fine and thrive on an entirely plant-based diet. For people who are sensitive on some level, consciously or subconsciously, to the inherent violence to animals and/or the environmental damage in animal agriculture, saying goodbye to these foods feels like a heavy weight of guilt lifted off your shoulders.

But to thrive on a vegan diet long-term it's important to find the correct information about vegan nutrition from trusted, science-based sources. Avoid the inevitable quacks, conspiracy theorists, and wishful thinking. You'll need to supplement a small number of vitamins, minerals and omega-3. Otherwise, there is a risk that longer-term you will not thrive and therefore revert to eating animal foods again.

Some of the most harmful ideas floating around are that humans are "meant to" eat certain foods, and that this is "natural", and that "natural" = good. Like Silva said, humans evolved as omnivores, opportunistic eaters, and generally an incredibly adaptable species which has succeeded exactly because of that. We invented fire so we could cook food which meant a whole new range of foods were available to us: meat and calorie-rich vegetables that require cooking such as potatoes and similar root vegetables. However, none of that dictates the diet for modern humans today. We only ate those foods because we had to to survive and be successful as a species in a difficult, unforgiving environment. Although, perhaps if there is one thing we can learn from our evolution, it's that we need to adapt our diet to the environment, and right now a vegan diet would go a long way towards reducing our environmental footprint which in this day and age has grown to become a problem for our continued survival.
 
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Lou

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This info is probably besides the point but its one of my interests so I will just throw it out.

Before our "ancestors" had fire and stone tools, its unlikely they ate very much meat. Our "claws" and "teeth" are not adapted for those kind of things. Not even as well adapted for those things as chimps. There is even archaeological evidence of such.

But most of "our" evolution was done way before. Homo sapiens always had fire and tools but if you go back further our prior ancestors didn't and had more similarities to us than differences.
 
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Danielle

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I like to take b12 gummies myself. everyone can benefit from supplementing b12, not just vegans. D, too, because how many people get enough sun?
For me it's defiantly conscious related. I think if I can live and eat yummy food without animal products, then I don't want animals to die for me.
 
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Tom L.

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I have b12 deficiency as mentioned in another post and I am afraid of pills and shots so right now I make an exception and eat an egg,...
I know B-12 is a necessary nutrient, and that it's not generally found in vegan foods. I'm not doubting you when you say you have a B-12 deficiency, and I understand your aversion to shots. BUT.... what's your problem with pills? People don't generally get B-12 as an injection unless they have an inability to absorb it from their food; this is the usual reason for B-12 deficiency. (Of course you can get the same problem if you're not consuming enough B-12 in your food to begin with.) The B-12 supplement I'm taking has about 20 times the RDA in each tablet, so I just put out one tablet a week and nibble at it every day or so, simply because I have reason to think my body absorbs it more efficiently that way. Like most B vitamins, B-12 isn't toxic in unusually large doses. At the moment, they're pretty much the only supplement I take, other than an occasional calcium tablet (about 300mg of calcium as calcium carbonate- roughly 1/3 of my daily requirement, but don't quote me on it until you've looked it up yourself). And remember lots of non-vegetarians and non-vegans don't get as much calcium as they need. Even so, I don't rely on supplements as a rule because a diet of whole foods is generally better for you- but if I have reason to think I'm short on a nutrient, I have no problem with specific supplements. You should get regular checkups and tell your health care provider about your diet.

But that brings me back to the question: what's your problem with pills? I wouldn't see anything wrong if someone ate junk and made up for this by popping pills- if this worked. But it doesn't. Pills can't compensate for a bad diet. But they can help in certain instances.
 

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The B-12 supplement I'm taking has about 20 times the RDA in each tablet, so I just put out one tablet a week and nibble at it every day or so, simply because I have reason to think my body absorbs it more efficiently that way.
What you said makes sense but is not the recommended approach. Especially at your age.

I always have trouble with remembering numbers, especially big ones but I'm very sure you are being way too conservative. Especially considering your age. (Seniors like ourselves are less effective at absorbing B12.

I think the recommeded amount for regular people is something like 2000 mg a week. That is 80 times the RDA, (Dr. Gregar has an article that explains this in full.). He recommends 1000 mg a day for seniors.

Taking small amounts several times of day is also a good approach. I do that with fortified soy milk and my regular multi. (Gregar's only issue with this is its inconvenience - but I have no issue with it). But being a suspenders and belt kind of guy - I've stated taking a 1000 mg twice a week.

My advice to you, Tom, and to the OP is to take 1000 mg every day. it's also a very economical strategy. About 5¢ a day.

 
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Tom L.

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@Lou I'm not sure why I've been conservative about supplementing with B-12. I still think it's a good idea to spread my intake out over a day or two to more efficiently absorb it.

Thanks for this info.
 

Lou

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@Lou I'm not sure why I've been conservative about supplementing with B-12. I still think it's a good idea to spread my intake out over a day or two to more efficiently absorb it.

Thanks for this info.
Tom, I think you have the right idea. I am really bad with numbers but going to look this up.

There is a really good article somewhere on the web but so far I haven't found it.

basically, you can only absorb about Half a Microgram of B12 at once. The RDA is 1.8 mcg. So you can reach that by taking small doses of B12 three to four times a day. I find this to be Not so hard because I drink 2 - 3 glasses of fortified soy milk a day. and my multi has B12 in it too. After your body has absorbed that half a mcg, it takes a few hours to recharge. So you have to spread out the intakes by a few hours each.

after you have absorbed that half a microgram, you can only absorb a very small percentage of B12, about 1%. So if you take a 50 mcg pill, you get the first half a mcg, then at a 1% rate you get about .5 mcg more. So that is a good daily dose.
 
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I have had imflammation in my stomach lining which may be causing the poor b12 absorbtion, as well as an emergency laparotomy which left my stomach never quite working the same. My fear of pills is psychological to a great extent. I fear man made artificial things. I've taken anti depressants/anti anxiety medicine and had really bad side effects. I have a great deal of anxiety right now. My b12 has tested 150/260 range. I don't know if this is causing the anxiety. I remember being in the hospital with low potassium once and they pumped so many fluids in me and it never went up. Finally they gave me a banana and it went up. I can't help to wonder if the same thing is true of all food, including the b 12. I'm afraid somehow it will just mess with my neurotransmitters and brain even more to take something artificial.

I don't want to eat meat. I have been on a low carb diet all my life though, and eating lots of carbs increases my anxiety for some reason. It's really hard to be vegan without eating a lot of carbs. I don't like to eat tofu because it's fortified. Basically anything that is not a natural whole food by itself I am scared of. This is how I ended up eating nothing but peanut butter for a long time. I know people will say go to a psychiatrist but this is costly and hasn't worked much so I'm just looking to other beings around me for some advice, and knowledge.

Somebody mentioned the omega 3's. I do eat avocados, and occasionally pecans, and walnuts. (I also eat a lot of spinach, sauerkraut, spring greens, onions, tomatoes ) Will the avocado and walnuts help to balance out the omega 6's of the peanut butter? When I look at the omega 3 content of avocados it doesn't seem like there is as much omega 3 in it as you would think.
 
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Lou

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I have had imflammation in my stomach lining which may be causing the poor b12 absorbtion,

The site of B12 absorption is somewhere in your small intestine. So your stomach lining has little to do with it. BTW, the small intestine is where most of your nutrients are absorbed. There are also ways to totally circumvent your intestines. B12 nasal sprays and sublingual lozenges send B12 right to your blood stream.


My fear of pills is psychological to a great extent. I fear man made artificial things.

Well the first step in fixing a problem is recognizing you have one. So ... Step one - done! Good job.
I've taken anti depressants/anti anxiety medicine and had really bad side effects. I have a great deal of anxiety right now.

Those kind of meds are very tricky. It takes both time and a certain amount of endurance to get the right type of medication and its dosage dialed in. And they all seem to have side effects. So many doctors take the easy path and reach for their prescription pad. I think a better road is diet and exercise. also the company you keep. Good habits, behavior modification, good sleeping habits and some meditation. And talk therapy.

My b12 has tested 150/260 range. I don't know if this is causing the anxiety.

It might but just from what you have reported so far I would guess it is not the sole contributor.
I remember being in the hospital with low potassium once and they pumped so many fluids in me and it never went up. Finally they gave me a banana and it went up.

You ever have a jar and you try and try and can't get the top off. then the next person pops it right off. Sort of the same thing. The banana popped the lid off but the infusions loosened the lid.

I also suspect that the doctors at the hospital were being very conservative with the concentration of Potassium. in high levels its toxic.
I can't help to wonder if the same thing is true of all food, including the b 12.

Well some vitamins and minerals are available in different forms. Bannas contain Potassium chloride. Which Iis necessary for many metabolic processes. Potassium citric is used to treat kidney stones. I doubt if the infusion contained potassium citrate.
This kind of detail dose show up in various supplements. But usually its not something to worry about. And not something I want to get into here.

in general, our bodies don't know if a vitamin is naturally forming or was created in a lab.
I don't want to eat meat.

We can agree on that.
I have been on a low carb diet all my life though, and eating lots of carbs increases my anxiety for some reason.

Actually there is some scientific evidence on that.
Most importantly, it's the simple carbs (highly refined ) carbs that can spike your glucose level. They can also trigger adrenaline. And the adrenaline can make you feel edgy.
Even complex carbs can affect your mood in a negative way. It has to do with your GABA levels. and low carb diets are assoiated with Low GABA levels. (1)
BTW, this is not yet proven but there is some good evidence.

This does not mean you have to avoid all carbs. Quite the contrary. the following vegan foods are associated with increasing GABA levels.
  • Mushrooms
  • Tomatoes
  • Broccoli
  • Walnuts
  • Soybeans (4)
In conjunction you need B6. either from a supplement or
  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Garlic
  • Bananas
It's really hard to be vegan without eating a lot of carbs. I don't like to eat tofu because it's fortified.

I can't imagine being vegan without my soy milk and tofu. but I know it can be done. Things are tough enough already. Why invent new obstacles. Many vegans struggle with getting enough protein, iron, calcium, B12, and D. I do. Those are the things that soy milk and tofu are fortified with! There is a reason that tofu is the mascot of vegans everywhere. :)

I've said many time before. Carbs do not deserve the bad rap they have gotten. Moderate to high carb diets have been associated with lots and lots of positive results. (ohmygosh, I hope David3 doesn't make me cite my sources)

Basically anything that is not a natural whole food by itself I am scared of. This is how I ended up eating nothing but peanut butter for a long time. I know people will say go to a psychiatrist but this is costly and hasn't worked much so I'm just looking to other beings around me for some advice, and knowledge.

Well I'm happy to continue providing you with answers and advice. but I do think a lot of your issues are psychological. although I believe you CAN overcome these without "talk therapy", I do think the journey would be facilitated with a good guide.

If you don't have health care - get it. and if you do have it and counseling isn't covered - upgrade it. And if counseling is available then take advantage of it. I think we are not only talking with a quality of life issue but a just plain ol' heath issue.

I just did a little googling and you may have a case of Chemophobia. It might be nice to know that enough other people share your anxieties that they bothered to give it a name. it appears that the cure is talk therapy. You might ask around your area and see if anyone specializes in it. There may even be a support group. (3)
Somebody mentioned the omega 3's. I do eat avocados, and occasionally pecans, and walnuts. (I also eat a lot of spinach, sauerkraut, spring greens, onions, tomatoes ) Will the avocado and walnuts help to balance out the omega 6's of the peanut butter? When I look at the omega 3 content of avocados it doesn't seem like there is as much omega 3 in it as you would think.

The best vegan source of Omega 3 is ground Flax seed. One or two tbsp a day should do it. But the whole omega thing is complicated and I'm now worn out.

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(1) Does the Keto Diet Cause or Relieve Depression?
(2) https://www.objectivewellness.com/j...-5-ways-to-boost-your-brains-calming-chemical
(3) Chemophobia - RationalWiki
(4) no wonder I'm so happy. Broccoli, mushroom, and tofu stir fry is a staple in my house.
 
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