Price of food

janezl

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Nov 21, 2019
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Location
Slovenia
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  1. Vegetarian
Hi,
I am curious about the prices of staple vegan foods in places where you live. Below is the list of things I usually get in my local store in Slovenia. I am a student, so my budget is a bit limited. I try to buy things on sale and below are the prices for mostly the cheapest brands - that also means non-organic and sometimes lower quality. But I am consistent with buying local fruit and vegetables - as much as possible.

White rice (1.5-3.5€ per kg)
Brown rice (cant get it below 4.5€/kg)
Whole grain spaghetti (2.5/kg)
Potatos (0.8€/kg)
Canned beans (0.7-1€/ can - 240g of beans)
Tofu (1€ per block - 200g)
Tomato sauce (1.7€/kg)
Flaxseed (2€/kg)
Pumpkin seeds (8-10€/kg)
Peanut butter (7€/kg)
Frozen blueberries (8.5€/kg) - never buy them because unfortunately I dont have a freezer
Bananas (1.2€/kg)
Apples (1-2€/kg)
Bell peppers (2.8€/kg)
Zucchini (3€/kg)
Kale (0.9€/kg)
Cabbage (1€/kg)
Carrots (0.7€/kg)
Radicchio, lettuce (1-3€/kg)
Avocado (1.5-2.5€/piece; it depends on the supply)
Walnuts, hazelnuts (12€/kg)
Dried fruits (6-10€/kg to up to 20 (I dont buy those though:))

Hope I didnt miss anything!
Looking forward to your replies!

Edit: the prices for vegetables above are for winter season - in summer they can be up to 3 times cheaper.
 

David3

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I'm in Southern California, USA, and I think that our prices are similar to yours. An exception is the price of (russet) potatoes, which are less expensive (sometimes as low as $1 for a 10 pound bag).
.
 

Nekodaiden

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The price of food where I live varies. A block of tofu can vary by $1-2 depending on what store it's purchased at and where that store is. This difference reflects the general area where I live, in semi-rural, suburban Australia, outside the larger cities. One can buy rice at the supermarket, or at Asian grocers, where it is usually cheaper and there is more variety. Some people operate small farms and sell their produce by the roadside, cheaper still. And there are farmer's markets, where produce is generally cheaper than the one stop shop that supermarkets represent.