Nutrition & Diet Finally! the truth about oil (mainstream media)

Emma JC

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Finally! the truth about oil as food is hitting the mainstream media

Coconut oil is marketed as healthy, but it has more saturated fat than butter or lard
'It's unfortunate that coconut oil has been given this health halo,' says human nutrition expert


Katie Pedersen, Chelsea Gomez, Asha Tomlinson · CBC News · Posted: Nov 15, 2019 4:00 AM ET | Last Updated: 6 hours ago

It's regularly touted as a "superfood" or a "healthy fat" and is found in supermarkets and health food stores across the country.

But coconut oil is made up almost entirely of saturated fat. In a 14-gram tablespoon, about 13 grams — over 90 per cent — is saturated fat.

That's nearly double the amount in the same volume of butter, 2.5 times as much as lard, and more than six times the saturated fat of olive oil.

Marketplace reviewed the study that seemed to spark the coconut oil health craze, and found that even its author isn't buying into the health trend.

You can read the rest in the attached article...

Emma JC

 

shyvas

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I have read many conflicting information about coconut oil these last few years. I only use it in moderation, especially when making plant based desserts such as chocolate bark or sometimes muffins. :cool:

''Coconut oil is a very controversial product, and the latest recommendations of the American Association of Cardiology have caused even more controversy.

There’s still one major question: Is it extremely beneficial or dangerously harmful?

Even scientists have failed to reach a consensus, not to mention the broader public. We’ll take a look at 21 arguments, alternating “for” and “against”. But first,
the most important thing to note: eating large portions of coconut oil could increase your risk of cardiovascular disease, although the results of studies related to this vary.''



 
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Emma JC

Emma JC

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eat the olive, not the oil

eat the vegetable, not the oil

eat the coconut, not the oil

satiety_oil_chicken_vegetables.jpg


IMO Emma JC
 

Veganman

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eat the olive, not the oil

eat the vegetable, not the oil

eat the coconut, not the oil

I've recently been reading and hearing about how plant-based oils are to be avoided and have some basic questions.

Is it mainly the calories and fat that are of concern or is there something otherwise inherently unhealthy about these oils? Doesn't the body require some fat in the diet?

I realize that many food items such as protein bars already contain some oil, but if one is thin and doesn't otherwise get much fat during the day is it so bad to have a couple teaspoons of organic flax, sesame or olive oil or is the concern just about people using these oils to excess?
 
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SapphireLightning

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I've recently been reading and hearing about how plant-based oils are to be avoided and have some basic questions.

Is it mainly the calories and fat that are of concern or is there something otherwise inherently unhealthy about these oils? Doesn't the body require some fat in the diet?

I realize that many food items such as protein bars already contain some oil, but if one is thin and doesn't otherwise get much fat during the day is it so bad to have a couple teaspoons of organic flax, sesame or olive oil or is the concern just about people using these oils to excess?

Not just plant based oils, Lard and Tallow are probably even worse than any commonly found plant oils. Lard, Tallow, coconut oil, palm oil are all high in saturated fat. Lard and Tallow are also high in cholesterol (something not found in plants). Basically, when you remove the lipids (fats/oils) from a food, and then use that extracted oil in cooking, you are potentially doing some harm to your body depending on amounts and how often. Yes you do need lipids, but you should be getting those from your foods in what some call the "food matrix", basically those lipid molecules are still encapsulated inside the cells, so it takes more time for it to get in to your blood stream.

The take away: Eat a handful of cashews or add some ground flax meal to your oatmeal, don't consume extracted oils. If you need more lipids, eat whole foods that contain (hopefully mostly unsaturated) more lipids.
 
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TofuRobot

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I've recently been reading and hearing about how plant-based oils are to be avoided and have some basic questions.

Is it mainly the calories and fat that are of concern or is there something otherwise inherently unhealthy about these oils? Doesn't the body require some fat in the diet?

I realize that many food items such as protein bars already contain some oil, but if one is thin and doesn't otherwise get much fat during the day is it so bad to have a couple teaspoons of organic flax, sesame or olive oil or is the concern just about people using these oils to excess?
The biggest thing is that oil is not food. There is no such thing as an oil tree. Oil is almost entirely devoid of nutrients (this is easily verified by plugging it in on Cronometer). When we feed our bodies with high calorie, nutrient deficient stuff, our bodies are left craving the nutrients we are depriving them of, and you combine this stuff with highly addictive sugar or salt and you end up craving more of that - it's a vicious circle.

If what you're after is massive amounts of calories as quickly as possible, without concern for your health, consume oil.:
 

Lou

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I've recently been reading and hearing about how plant-based oils are to be avoided and have some basic questions.

Is it mainly the calories and fat that are of concern or is there something otherwise inherently unhealthy about these oils? Doesn't the body require some fat in the diet?

I realize that many food items such as protein bars already contain some oil, but if one is thin and doesn't otherwise get much fat during the day is it so bad to have a couple teaspoons of organic flax, sesame or olive oil or is the concern just about people using these oils to excess?


I think you got it just about exactly right.

The way I like to think about it is by using a little Econ 101 and the concept of Opportunity Cost. When you look at buying something you not only have to consider what the thing costs - but also what you could have bought instead.

Since we can't eat unlimited calories, you have to make your calories count. And every tbsp of oil has 100 calories. So if you add a tbsp of oil to your fry pan - that means one less banana you can afford to eat. :)

Although fat is a required nutrient. The standard American has no problem meeting the RDA of fat. The RDA is to make fat at least 20 % of your diet. I think some doctors say up to 35% is good. But I think keeping it between 20 and 30 is even better. Even vegans really have no issue meeting the RDA of fat without even trying. Tofu is like 45% fat. Soy milk is 30%. Peanut butter is 70%.

I've found it is hard to keep it below 30%.

Check out CronOmeter and let if figure out if you are getting enough fat.
 

Veganman

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Not just plant based oils, Lard and Tallow are probably even worse than any commonly found plant oils. Lard, Tallow, coconut oil, palm oil are all high in saturated fat.

I'm limiting my choices to plant-based oils. I always assumed that these fats were not harmful, especially compared to animal fat. I recall a graph in The China Study where incidence of a particular disease is plotted vs. fat intake. Each data point on the graph corresponded to a different country and there was a strong correlation between incidence and fat. But when incidence was plotted vs. vegetable fat intake, there was no longer a correlation.

Now of course I wouldn't suggest drinking olive oil straight from the bottle, but this idea that plant-based oils are to be avoided even when used in moderation is new to me so I'm just trying to get my head around it. I assumed that for a thin person who doesn't otherwise get much fat in their vegan diet a teaspoon or two of oil a day would actually help to meet some kind of daily fat intake requirement.
 

SapphireLightning

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I'm limiting my choices to plant-based oils. I always assumed that these fats were not harmful, especially compared to animal fat. I recall a graph in The China Study where incidence of a particular disease is plotted vs. fat intake. Each data point on the graph corresponded to a different country and there was a strong correlation between incidence and fat. But when incidence was plotted vs. vegetable fat intake, there was no longer a correlation.

Now of course I wouldn't suggest drinking olive oil straight from the bottle, but this idea that plant-based oils are to be avoided even when used in moderation is new to me so I'm just trying to get my head around it. I assumed that for a thin person who doesn't otherwise get much fat in their vegan diet a teaspoon or two of oil a day would actually help to meet some kind of daily fat intake requirement.

Many of the studies I have seen show a correlation with oil consumption and endothelial cell destruction. Those endothelial cells are uber important when it comes to CV health.
I am getting ready for work so couldn't find much info right off hand bu here is something to consider:

 
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silva

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Oils are pressed out of food- the same food that delivers fat when you eat the whole seed, nut, fruit, veg, bean. Oil is just concentrated fat and calories, devoid of the fiber and nutrients the whole food contains. We really don't need anymore than we would get by eating a wfpb diet.
Dr Esselstyns' How to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease diet is as extreme as not allowing any more than a tbls of ground flax seeds for fat in treating heart patients. No nuts, seeds, avocado...and it's worked! Now that is a diet strictly for existing heart problems, but shows how little fat we really need. Just cutting out oils themselves is shown to reduce inflammation and improve heart health
Wfpb diets for health are gaining, I think, more rapidly for those seeking reversal of health conditions, like heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, copd....than veganism.

If you're really interested, the book Whole by Colin Campbell (China Study) or How Not to Die are great resources

 

Lou

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Okay, but as a vegan I am not consuming the standard American diet.

Right. Neither am I.
but as I mentioned there are plenty of fats in the "Standard American Vegan Diet"

Like I said earlier, "vegans really have no issue meeting the RDA of fat without even trying. Tofu is like 45% fat. Soy milk is 30%. Peanut butter is 70%."

Add a tbsp of ground flaxseed to one of your meals. Add a handful of nuts to your daily meal plan.

Yesterday my fat intake was 24% of my calories - and I wasn't even trying.

Check out your fat intake in CronOmeter. And if its low treat yourself to some guacamole.
 

Veganman

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Oils are pressed out of food- the same food that delivers fat when you eat the whole seed, nut, fruit, veg, bean. Oil is just concentrated fat and calories, devoid of the fiber and nutrients the whole food contains. We really don't need anymore than we would get by eating a wfpb diet.

Please understand that I am not trying to be argumentative or push an alternate theory. What you say makes a lot of sense and I am just trying to learn...

Yes, oil is devoid of the fiber and nutrients of the whole food but the little I use is always in combination with other things such as toast, vegetables, etc. and not taken alone as some kind of supplement. I just had a handful of walnuts and could feel the oil coming out of them and that is probably the best way to get it. But if I squeezed that same oil out of the nuts and combined it with other wholesome food, would that be significantly different?
 
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Veganman

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Many of the studies I have seen show a correlation with oil consumption and endothelial cell destruction. Those endothelial cells are uber important when it comes to CV health.
I am getting ready for work so couldn't find much info right off hand bu here is something to consider:


That study is about using oil in deep-frying, which I never do.
 
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Lou

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Please understand that I am not trying to be argumentative or push an alternate theory. What you say makes a lot of sense and I am just trying to learn...

Yes, oil is devoid of the fiber and nutrients of the whole food but the little I use is always in combination with other things such as toast, vegetables, etc. and not taken alone as some kind of supplement. I just had a handful of walnuts and could feel the oil coming out of them and that is probably the best way to get it. But if I squeezed that same oil out of the nuts and combined it with other wholesome food, would that be significantly different?


I realize that you are not being argumentative, just interested, curious, and concerned.

I think there must be some point that we haven't explained correctly or perhaps you just missed.

So.... lets just look at 1 tbsp of walnut oil. it has 120 calories, 13 grams of fat, and absolutely nothing else.

Then compare that to 4 - 5 walnuts (about 20 grams). it also has about 120 calories. But it also has 2 grams of carbs, 3 grams of protein, and a third of the RDA of copper and Manganese. So, more nutrients. but maybe the most important thing is that 4 - 5 walnuts make for a decent snack.

Again look at Emma's picture. this time think of 3 tbsp of walnut oil in the first one and 15 walnuts in the second (not that you should eat that many walnuts but if you did you would get your RDA of copper and manganese)
 
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TofuRobot

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Please understand that I am not trying to be argumentative or push an alternate theory. What you say makes a lot of sense and I am just trying to learn...

Yes, oil is devoid of the fiber and nutrients of the whole food but the little I use is always in combination with other things such as toast, vegetables, etc. and not taken alone as some kind of supplement. I just had a handful of walnuts and could feel the oil coming out of them and that is probably the best way to get it. But if I squeezed that same oil out of the nuts and combined it with other wholesome food, would that be significantly different?
Look up the work of Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn. Every time you consume saturated fat, you damage your endothelium, which puts you at risk for heart disease later in life. It's not something that happens overnight, but it can and will catch up with you.

"NO OIL! Not even olive oil, which goes against a lot of other advice out there about so-called good fats. The reality is that oils are extremely low in terms of nutritive value. They contain no fiber, no minerals and are 100% fat calories. Both the mono unsaturated and saturated fat contained in oils is harmful to the endothelium, the innermost lining of the artery, and that injury is the gateway to vascular disease. It doesn’t matter whether it’s olive oil, corn oil, coconut oil, canola oil, or any other kind. Avoid ALL oil."
 
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silva

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I absolutely believe the research proves the superiority of wfpb eating, no oil, no sugar--I'm on the fence on the no salt thing cause I can;t make it work for me... but anyway....
If someone is suffering from health issues I would absolutely suggest they do it 100%. I have followed Dr Gregers daily dozen way of eating (woe) on and off and can attest that strict adherence can work miracles than any added non complient foods 'in moderation' can.
Having said that, I have an awful time keeping to it, and go back to adding things like vegan mayo, and oil. You can still agree on the research whether you follow it yourself or not!