Animal Rights Can an Animal Have Rights and Still Be Dinner?

Indian Summer

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The phrase “animal rights” gets tossed around a lot these days. More often than not it’s mentioned in the context of Peter Singer’s Animal Liberation. But it really shouldn’t be—and those who reflect on the ethics of meat eating should understand why. Singer’s case against eating animals, influential as it is, never grants animals rights. It only acknowledges that sentient animals have morally significant interests and that, as a result, we should make decisions whereby the greatest good is achieved for the greatest number.

As I pointed out in my last column, the utilitarian calculus has two implications for meat eating. One, it makes eating meat sourced from agriculture pretty much a moral impossibility—the pleasure of taste can never outweigh the suffering of slaughter. Two, in its denial of inherent rights to animals, utilitarianism creates space for other forms of ethical meat consumption—so long as overall goodness is maximized (which, I argue, it can be).[...]
More: http://www.psmag.com/health-and-behavior/can-an-animal-have-rights-and-still-be-dinner (August 19, 2015)

It seems the only way the author can answer "yes" to this question is if it's meat from animals that have died not by the deliberate hand of humans. Is that still ethically acceptable?