Any vegans who are not huge foodies?

deadknight

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Any other vegans out there who are not exactly huge foodies?

Yes I get it, everybody enjoys good food.
However, I seem to have so little interest in gastronomy that I began to find it concerning.
It's not about me thinking that learning how to cook is "under my dignity", it's just not my priority. I keep finding it to be time-wasting, and to be honest, boring. You work for an hour to prepare a dish that's eaten in 15 minutes' time, and thereafter you spend half an hour tidying up. My significant other isn't very interested in cooking either, but I see this shouldn't go on this way!
No, there's nothing wrong with hummus sandwiches, baked beans w/ toast, instant vegan ramyun, nuts, fruits and root vegetables, and there are surprisingly many ready-made things that are coincidentally vegan, but I really don't know what to do.
Cannot quite understand people spending so much time eating, chatting about food, mentioning eating as their interest or pastime. Yes, eating is necessary to survive, and yes, I appreciate good food, but I usually have other things in my mind.

Anybody else?
How do you guys cope with literally having to force yourselves to knock up something eatable?
Have you got some ideas on how to make things that don't demand so much time - and you don't end up with tons of dirty dishes to wash?
 
I love food and love cooking but I see how it can be pointless for somebody who doesn't. It's like how I view Christmas - the expense and hassle just for one day that is never as exciting as it promised to be. I don't "force myself" to cook and prepare food, to me it is a creative pursuit like my music and painting and I get a lot of pleasure out of it.
 
I'm not sure if I'm a foodie or not
but...
I think vegans are sort of ... herded... towards cooking.
Vegan restaurants are rare and although many restaurants have vegan choices I can't afford to eat out all the time.
And prepared vegan food or frozen
So... I had to learn to cook.
My mom started me off with her own cooking lessons like 50 years ago and since I consider myself a lifetime learner I haven't stopped learning how to cook.
So it was very natural for me as I transitioned to vegan eating I would learn about vegan cooking.

I'm not sure I spend much more time cooking that any other bachelor. I'm a big fan of bulk preparation. I even did that before I learned to be vegan. but I have continued to evolve in that direction.

Purchasing an Instant Pot only added to my efficiency. I don't even make pasta or oatmeal one at a time anymore. I even bulk prepare my burritos and salads.
 
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I guess it's a function of interest. I can certainly understand not enjoying or being interested cooking. I have one friend who loathes cooking, and she doesn't really enjoy meal-type food all that much. She'd rather eat snacks/candy/junk food than meals.

I love being in the kitchen -- creating, working with my hands (like making bread) and challenging myself to come up with delicious meals. I find being in the kitchen therapeutic and a lot of fun. Yes, it can be messy with all the dishes and whatnot, but when you hit on something just right (like the vegan stew recipe I tried last week), it's so gratifying. I guess I'm a foodie? I do enjoy eating delicious food, and I want the food I make to be delicious :)
 
My way of dealing with most of your concerns is to have similar meals that I love on a regular basis and therefore only dinner time is up in the air.

We both work from home so that makes it easier too. We normally do not eat until 12-1 pm and Mon-Fri I have either noodley soup, oatmeal or a wrap of some kind with banana pb&j. Saturdays is steel cut oat day and Sunday brunch is always beans on toast with a side of either Just Egg patty, hash brown or vegan sausage with orange/banana slices.

We have a rotation of dinners that we love and although it is mostly me that does the prep/cooking my honey does occassionally help or make the meal, usually our pasta meal on Saturday nights.

I do love a lot of the process also because of the smells and the sense of accomplishment from cutting the onions and garlic (they are in pretty much every meal) the potatoes, the carrots or making an amazing pizza.

So I would suggest keep it simple, eat what you love and if that involves the same thing regularly, that is okay, and eating only twice a day makes it even simpler.

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com
 
I love food and love cooking but I see how it can be pointless for somebody who doesn't. It's like how I view Christmas - the expense and hassle just for one day that is never as exciting as it promised to be. I don't "force myself" to cook and prepare food, to me it is a creative pursuit like my music and painting and I get a lot of pleasure out of it.
Interesting that you mention Xmas - from year to year, it's always the same, yes. They begin with those kitschy decorations and songs already in October, Christmas sale in November, and the like... and people get exhausted and bored, ending up being tired of the whole thing. As you're pointing at it, so much fuss for just one day.
I see how cooking can be a very creative activity - my bad, I prefer channeling the same amount of creativity to learning or teaching guitar. Yes, I experienced that peeling and slicing vegetables might give a good training to one's fingers, but it doesn't train you in keys, modes and chord patterns.

I'm not sure if I'm a foodie or not
but...
I think vegans are sort of ... herded... towards cooking.
Vegan restaurants are rare and although many restaurants have vegan choices I can't afford to eat out all the time.
And prepared vegan food or frozen
So... I had to learn to cook.
My mom started me off with her own cooking lessons like 50 years ago and since I consider myself a lifetime learner I haven't stopped learning how to cook.
So it was very natural for me as I transitioned to vegan eating I would learn about vegan cooking.

I'm not sure I spend much more time cooking that any other bachelor. I'm a big fan of bulk preparation. I even did that before I learned to be vegan. but I have continued to evolve in that direction.

Purchasing an Instant Pot only added to my efficiency. I don't even make pasta or oatmeal one at a time anymore. I even bulk prepare my burritos and salads.
That's true, if you are a vegan you'll have no other choice than learning to cook your own food, this is the only way to make sure it's indeed vegan - you know what you've put into it.
You know what? I wouldn't eat out even if I could afford it. I don't know if this counts as frugality, but eating out feels so snobbish. Even if I'm not eating at a very exclusive or expensive restaurant, I get this spoilt and snobbish vibe that feels not quite natural for me.
Bulk preparation sounds like a good idea - if you have to cook stuff, then it's worth making much of it so that it can go to the freezer, yes.

I guess it's a function of interest. I can certainly understand not enjoying or being interested cooking. I have one friend who loathes cooking, and she doesn't really enjoy meal-type food all that much. She'd rather eat snacks/candy/junk food than meals.

I love being in the kitchen -- creating, working with my hands (like making bread) and challenging myself to come up with delicious meals. I find being in the kitchen therapeutic and a lot of fun. Yes, it can be messy with all the dishes and whatnot, but when you hit on something just right (like the vegan stew recipe I tried last week), it's so gratifying. I guess I'm a foodie? I do enjoy eating delicious food, and I want the food I make to be delicious :)
I can certainly relate to this friend of yours, though I understand eating sensible meals should be the norm.
I enjoy eating delicious food too, it's just about the kitchen not being my favourite place.

My way of dealing with most of your concerns is to have similar meals that I love on a regular basis and therefore only dinner time is up in the air.

We both work from home so that makes it easier too. We normally do not eat until 12-1 pm and Mon-Fri I have either noodley soup, oatmeal or a wrap of some kind with banana pb&j. Saturdays is steel cut oat day and Sunday brunch is always beans on toast with a side of either Just Egg patty, hash brown or vegan sausage with orange/banana slices.

We have a rotation of dinners that we love and although it is mostly me that does the prep/cooking my honey does occassionally help or make the meal, usually our pasta meal on Saturday nights.

I do love a lot of the process also because of the smells and the sense of accomplishment from cutting the onions and garlic (they are in pretty much every meal) the potatoes, the carrots or making an amazing pizza.

So I would suggest keep it simple, eat what you love and if that involves the same thing regularly, that is okay, and eating only twice a day makes it even simpler.

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com

Oh yes, noodle soup, oatmeal and eventual wraps are familiar at our place too. Beans on toast are nearly an everyday thing here, because this is the easiest.

Awww, funny that you're mentioning this, we've just had pasta this evening - though it's not Saturday - we both were quite exhausted but needed something warm. Gemelli pasta and vegan red pesto saved our lives for the day.

Good for you if you enjoy the smells! The sense of accomplishment is familiar to me - like, I made it, yeah! -, but not always to the level I find rewarding.

Yeah, these are good ideas! I'm trying to keep it simple - though I try my best to avoid monotony.
Oh yes! Did you know that people in the medieval times used to eat only twice - or max. thrice - a day? Two or three hearty meals, they didn't snack through the whole day.
 
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for my beans on toast I throw in onion and jalapeno, to the pot, first with a bit of olive brine, garlic powder, cumin, smoked paprika, and then beans in once this has sauted - this makes the meal tastier and hardier - occassionally we do also throw in some vegan weiners instead for a quick dinner

my noodley soup is a collage of tasty broth (I use gochujang and miso) and then tons of frozen veggies (brussel sprouts, green and yellow beans and carrots and a Thai veggie mix), a mushroom or two, a green onion, tons of kale plus Soy Curls, garlic powder and then once it is in my bowl I add rice vinegar, dry mustard powder, lemon juice, soy sauce, turmeric/pepper, sriracha sauce and a drizzle of tahini - it seems like it might be a lot of work but it really isn't as most of the veggies are frozen and I just line up all the extra ingredients while it is cooking... oh yes, and noodles go in towards the end, on top, so that they end up on the bottom in my bowl (use a pasta bowl) - so one pot, one bowl and I have an extremely satisfying and nutritious meal - I buy the packs of Mr Noodles when they are on sale and throw away the flavour packet - they aren't the healthiest of noodles but it is easy and cheap (27 cents)

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com
 
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for my beans on toast I throw in onion and jalapeno, to the pot, first with a bit of olive brine, garlic powder, cumin, smoked paprika, and then beans in once this has sauted - this makes the meal tastier and hardier - occassionally we do also throw in some vegan weiners instead for a quick dinner

my noodley soup is a collage of tasty broth (I use gochujang and miso) and then tons of frozen veggies (brussel sprouts, green and yellow beans and carrots and a Thai veggie mix), a mushroom or two, a green onion, tons of kale plus Soy Curls, garlic powder and then once it is in my bowl I add rice vinegar, dry mustard powder, lemon juice, soy sauce, turmeric/pepper, sriracha sauce and a drizzle of tahini - it seems like it might be a lot of work but it really isn't as most of the veggies are frozen and I just line up all the extra ingredients while it is cooking... oh yes, and noodles go in towards the end, on top, so that they end up on the bottom in my bowl (use a pasta bowl) - so one pot, one bowl and I have an extremely satisfying and nutritious meal - I buy the packs of Mr Noodles when they are on sale and throw away the flavour packet - they aren't the healthiest of noodles but it is easy and cheap (27 cents)

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com
You seem to have a great devotion for cooking! Your ideas - which are indeed very nice - assume exactly that level of devotion I usually don't seem to have. Maybe the pungent odours have something to do with this.
Yeah, vegan gochujang and miso are familiar for me too. The same goes for Sriracha, we use it on nearly everything! (Okay, usually not on the coincidally vegan punch rolls, but this is a rare exception.) These improvized "throw ev'rything in" ramens always come really handy - frozen vegs are not too expensive and noodles are ridiculously cheap - and I agree they don't demand too much work.
 
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You know what? I wouldn't eat out even if I could afford it. I don't know if this counts as frugality, but eating out feels so snobbish. Even if I'm not eating at a very exclusive or expensive restaurant, I get this spoilt and snobbish vibe that feels not quite natural for me.
I wouldn't eat out now having been a dishwasher for a number of years and knowing how badly dishwashers are treated for the small pay they get. Also the environmental impact of so much wasted food and excessive water use for something none of us need. I just don't want to support such. Anyway sorry for being somewhat off-topic.
 
I wouldn't eat out now having been a dishwasher for a number of years and knowing how badly dishwashers are treated for the small pay they get. Also the environmental impact of so much wasted food and excessive water use for something none of us need. I just don't want to support such. Anyway sorry for being somewhat off-topic.
I think it's acceptably off, especially for such a good point.
This is exactly why I would feel spoilt when eating out. The staff needs to be nice, even if they find me (or any other guest) an annoying a***hole; the kitchen workers who wash the dirty dishes are so underpaid that it's humiliating; food waste, water use - as you're mentioning it. That's an unnecessary luxury.
Anyway, I have a big respect for your having done this unpleasant job for years!
 
I find the foodie thing a bit odd, but people like eating I guess. I watch some of these cooking shows and the fascination for dressing up food and savouring its flavour etc borders on a religious experience. For me food is usually just food. I have some things I like more than others but generally speaking I am happy to eat much the same things day by day. I have very little sense of smell so maybe that's part of it.
 
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I find the foodie thing a bit odd, but people like eating I guess. I watch some of these cooking shows and the fascination for dressing up food and savouring its flavour etc borders on a religious experience. For me food is usually just food. I have some things I like more than others but generally speaking I am happy to eat much the same things day by day. I have very little sense of smell so maybe that's part of it.
Same here. Food is usually just food. Cooking shows are really not my kind of thing.
Yes I have my favourites too, but... that's it.
That's interesting - you say you have very little sense of smell and maybe this is why you are not such a huge fan of food? I have a very strong sense of smell and this is why the aromatic odours of frying onion, garlic, smoked paprika and the like irritates me.
 
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