Plant Based Diet and Health

LoreD

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Interesting video about a man with some serious health problems that have been helped by switching to Whole Foods Plant Based Diet. The difference in his health over a 6 week period is extraordinary:

 
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LoreD, that's a good one! I really find most omnivores, just don't believe that wfpb'ed people FEEL SO MUCH BETTER. They are convinced somehow that anyone that tries a new diet is just saying that to convince others to eat the same way.

LoreD-- Go Packers. I also live in cowland. HI! Thanks for the video.
 
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LoreD, that's a good one! I really find most omnivores, just don't believe that wfpb'ed people FEEL SO MUCH BETTER. They are convinced somehow that anyone that tries a new diet is just saying that to convince others to eat the same way.

LoreD-- Go Packers. I also live in cowland. HI! Thanks for the video.


I just got back from my first checkup since the pandemic. My BP was 124/86, I am on no medications, and my blood tests were "perfect."

Not too bad for a woman pushing 70.
 
I just got back from my first checkup since the pandemic. My BP was 124/86, I am on no medications, and my blood tests were "perfect."

Not too bad for a woman pushing 70.
No kidding there! Well DONE! That is just so great!

I love eating this way, my blood pressure went down, my joints stopped aching, I have energy, I'm happier, I lost near 60 lbs and I don't want to change what is working so well!
 
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Mayo Clinic Minute: Busting plant-based diet myths​


Good to see the mainstream media taking us seriously.

Vegetarian diets have the reputation of being bland and not appetizing.​
"We might think of whole-food, plant-based foods as your boring old salad that is some lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes," says Dr. Nguyen.​
Prepared correctly, foods like asparagus, tofu and mushrooms can be savory. One of the biggest misconceptions about a plant-based diet is that it's difficult to get enough protein.​
"Common whole-food, plant-based sources of protein include beans, legumes, some nuts and seeds," explains Dr. Nguyen.​
Some people think this type of diet will lead to nutrient deficiencies. Eating a well-balanced diet of fruits and vegetables is key.​
"The colors associated with the different fruits and vegetables contain phytonutrients that can help boost the immune function," says Dr. Nguyen.​
Additional micronutrients, like vitamin B12 and vitamin D, can be supplemented. It's also important to talk to your primary care clinician about your diet.​

Plant-based diet benefits:​

  • Reduce heart disease.
  • Lower blood pressure.
  • Improve gut health.
  • Weight management.
  • Cutdown on risk of chronic disease.
  • Rich in nutrients.
  • Reduces environmental footprint.

 

Mayo Clinic Minute: Busting plant-based diet myths​


Good to see the mainstream media taking us seriously.

Vegetarian diets have the reputation of being bland and not appetizing.​
"We might think of whole-food, plant-based foods as your boring old salad that is some lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes," says Dr. Nguyen.​
Prepared correctly, foods like asparagus, tofu and mushrooms can be savory. One of the biggest misconceptions about a plant-based diet is that it's difficult to get enough protein.​
"Common whole-food, plant-based sources of protein include beans, legumes, some nuts and seeds," explains Dr. Nguyen.​
Some people think this type of diet will lead to nutrient deficiencies. Eating a well-balanced diet of fruits and vegetables is key.​
"The colors associated with the different fruits and vegetables contain phytonutrients that can help boost the immune function," says Dr. Nguyen.​
Additional micronutrients, like vitamin B12 and vitamin D, can be supplemented. It's also important to talk to your primary care clinician about your diet.​

Plant-based diet benefits:​

  • Reduce heart disease.
  • Lower blood pressure.
  • Improve gut health.
  • Weight management.
  • Cutdown on risk of chronic disease.
  • Rich in nutrients.
  • Reduces environmental footprint.

I think most people are too focused on what is excluded, instead of what is being included, on a plant based diet. Plant based dishes incorporate a much larger variety of foods, healthy foods, and the diet encourages trying new things. The standard American diet is mostly meat, cheese, and highly refined flour.
 
I think most people are too focused on what is excluded, instead of what is being included, on a plant based diet. Plant based dishes incorporate a much larger variety of foods, healthy foods, and the diet encourages trying new things. The standard American diet is mostly meat, cheese, and highly refined flour.
Exactly, as well as seeing eating plant based as some kind of extreme. Even when it's called a safe alternative it comes with admonitions of "properly planned" or 'carefully monitored', which translates into hard and extreme.
When you look at the changes of usual omnivore diets through history you'll find so many differences in where and what meats were consumed. Few people include insects or innards today, years back few ate well trimmed steaks, but it's under the omni umbrella. Why not think of vegan diets as just another way of being omni? You just leave out the animal products as those would leave out bugs.

Most people just aren't accustomed to making foods without meat or cheeses, yet it's easy, and becomes easier each meal you make. It kinda boggles my mind when I think back to how I'd eat foods I loved without cheese! I guess I was luckier than many in growing up where meat wasn't always served, and many soups didn't have meat components, as well as bean dishes
 
Exactly, as well as seeing eating plant based as some kind of extreme. Even when it's called a safe alternative it comes with admonitions of "properly planned" or 'carefully monitored', which translates into hard and extreme.
When you look at the changes of usual omnivore diets through history you'll find so many differences in where and what meats were consumed. Few people include insects or innards today, years back few ate well trimmed steaks, but it's under the omni umbrella. Why not think of vegan diets as just another way of being omni? You just leave out the animal products as those would leave out bugs.

Most people just aren't accustomed to making foods without meat or cheeses, yet it's easy, and becomes easier each meal you make. It kinda boggles my mind when I think back to how I'd eat foods I loved without cheese! I guess I was luckier than many in growing up where meat wasn't always served, and many soups didn't have meat components, as well as bean dishes
When people say it must be properly planned or carefully monitored disregards the fact most people couldn't afford a lot of meat and dairy on a regular basis until quite recently. People did just fine, even without supplements or access to a global food market. The rich who had better access to those foods, had worse health than the poor, who ate more plant based. Modern culture has become so meat and dairy based, people think a plant based diet is extreme, and bad for health, despite the evidence that the SAD diet is what is bad for health. I think supplements are a good thing, and you should monitor your nutrition, but most on the SAD diet do neither
 
if you look at the prevalence of heart disease, diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, etc. it seems like Omnis should be planning and monitoring their diets too.
I think the problem is they don't think about it, they won't take the time to read just one article on the subject.
 
My parents moved to Illinois from Mississippi in the 1950's. I would be sent to stay with my grandmother, or my father's family. On the farm, meat was a rarity, and usually was only used for seasoning. A few slices of bacon in a large pot of green beans or blackeyed peas. That was it. Chicken was only for when guests came to dinner. Usually, there were 4 or 5 bowls of vegetables, beans, and biscuits.

My grandmother said that people didn't eat much meat because if you had to raise the chicken from an egg, chase it around the barnyard, kill it, spend 2or 3 hours plucking it, and a couple of hours cooking it; it really cut down on your meat consumption.

Vegetables and beans were easy and fast. Pick, wash, boil, and eat.

They did eat a lot of eggs, though.
 
Why not think of vegan diets as just another way of being omni?
This is a great way of putting it! I will have to remember that one.
I understand the "properly planned" thing cuz people, especially health advocates, want people to go from a less healthy, advantageous diet, to one with clear benefits. Not realizing that even "junk food vegan" diets are still healthier. But,
if you look at the prevalence of heart disease, diabetes, vitamin deficiencies, etc. it seems like Omnis should be planning and monitoring their diets too.
Exactly this, its kinda hypocrisy.
If one is worried about the health of people converting to strict vegetarianism, one should be advocating *everyone* see a dietician.
Or at the very least see their GP on the reg.
Thats it.
Simple and way more effective.

I think too many people out there conflating strict vegetarians with eating disorderded people.
 
To add to my last post...
I remember being rly scared about going vegetarian because my overweight family, including my mom who pushed multivitamins on us kids, was certain you couldnt thrive without meat at every dinner.
I didnt know any better and i was worried id have to buy specialty foods.
But i eventually tried it after hearing the class veg going on about eating whatever his family made but saying no to the meat.
Noodles, mashed potatoes, green beans... I get by plenty fine! he would say.
And he did.
Very grateful for that guy.
 
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