Going from Veganish to Vegan

Lou

Master
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Reaction score
7,016
Age
65
Location
San Mateo, Ca
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
The main thing I struggle with is that when I try to go completely vegan, I get depression and joint pain. It's partly a "low blood sugar," type of feeling like you get when you reduce your caloric intake. But it sends my body into a yucky negative spiral where I feel too depressed to eat and then it gets worse.

I want to work with a nutritionist and develop a solid plan for transitioning in a healthy way so as to avoid this pitfall. I probably just need to plan meals rich in all the nutrients one could accidentally miss, including enough calories.

I don't know the laws in NY. but in California, anyone can call themselves a nutritionist. There are some good nutritionists in California but there are plenty of nutty ones. You want a Registered Dietician. It's not just semantics there are real differences. Although many people use the two words interchangeably - and the words mean different things in different countries. RDs have minimum education requriements from accredited colleges, meet criteria set by a governing body, and are re-certified on a regular basis.

I don't know if you need to work with a "nutritionist". For now, you can't go to see one anyway. So why not try to do it without one for now and then you can decide after the shelter in place is lifted if you need to see one.

You don't really need to pay anyone to "develop a solid plan for transitioning". There are any number of books and websites that have good plans already made. PCRM has the 21-day kickstart which is very good and easy to use. Dr. Furhman's Eat To Live has a good one in it too. I can't remember if Dr. Gregar's How Not To Die has one in it but he has the Daily Dozen checklist. You can probably get the e-books from the library, or order them from Amazon. The kickstart and the Daily Dozen are free and online. (I bet other forum members have some more good suggestions.)

I suppose if you follow a good plan you don't really need to track nutrients. But like I told you a week ago I am a big proponent of Cronometer. Tracking nutrients is not a substitute for a good plan, and I don't think it's essential. It's just a good tool.

The only meal plan I make is the one I make before I go to the grocery store. I use a chronometer mostly to make sure I get enough calories and protein.
 

silva

Master
Supporter
Joined
Jun 3, 2012
Reaction score
10,016
Location
USA
The main thing I struggle with is that when I try to go completely vegan, I get depression and joint pain. It's partly a "low blood sugar," type of feeling like you get when you reduce your caloric intake. But it sends my body into a yucky negative spiral where I feel too depressed to eat and then it gets worse.

I want to work with a nutritionist and develop a solid plan for transitioning in a healthy way so as to avoid this pitfall. I probably just need to plan meals rich in all the nutrients one could accidentally miss, including enough calories.
Have you looked into Dr Michael Gregers daily dozen - the list of foods, serving sizes, that make up a days nutrition?
When I followed that really close, like checking off every box when I ate, I admit I felt fantastic! Unfortunitely I fall off after about a month and a half.
I do take at least 1/4 teaspoon of tumeric and pinch of black pepper every day, and vitamin D3 (had really low level even with sun and D2). That keeps my inflammation from arthritis down
 

Lou

Master
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Reaction score
7,016
Age
65
Location
San Mateo, Ca
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
I should try the Daily Dozen again. The last time I tried it - I couldn't quite do it. It was just TOO much food.

I do agree that including spices in our foods is really important in good nutrition but I don't believe that 1/4 tsp of turmeric can really make much of a difference. But I add it to my daily smoothie cause I already bought it. Heck, it can't hurt ( i think). It's also good for tofu scrambles.

The Daily Dozen comes on an app that makes it pretty easy. but I like physical checklists.
You can print this one and get it laminated and stick it on your frig with a dry erase marker.

Also, it isn't as much food as it looks like at first blush. Check out the serving size on the other link.


 

silva

Master
Supporter
Joined
Jun 3, 2012
Reaction score
10,016
Location
USA
I should try the Daily Dozen again. The last time I tried it - I couldn't quite do it. It was just TOO much food.

I do agree that including spices in our foods is really important in good nutrition but I don't believe that 1/4 tsp of turmeric can really make much of a difference. But I add it to my daily smoothie cause I already bought it. Heck, it can't hurt ( i think). It's also good for tofu scrambles.

The Daily Dozen comes on an app that makes it pretty easy. but I like physical checklists.
You can print this one and get it laminated and stick it on your frig with a dry erase marker.

Also, it isn't as much food as it looks like at first blush. Check out the serving size on the other link.


I think I take more like a half teasp- I keep it mixed with black pepper in a jar with a small scoop and just add whatever drops out of it. I really hate it, exceptions being occasional curry powder and some chia tea I don't ever bother with. I chug it down in some vinegar and water every morning. I do find (maybe convinced myself?) it helps. Anyway, that's my routine and I'm sticking to it!
I also take a vegan algae dha - whatever is cheapest on amazon.
I'm not an amazon fan, but they do have some things better than other places
 

NYC Gardener

Practitioner
Joined
May 3, 2020
Reaction score
1,492
Age
41
Location
New York
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
I've made progress since posting this.

I have to say I feel a lot better since cutting out dairy! I feel calmer and more focused. I saw a comment from someone else in another thread saying something similar, so maybe there is something to this.

I'm just eating more beans and buying vegan sweets (cookies!). The beans seem to make a big difference nutritionally. A variety of beans. Not just soy products and meat substitutes.
 

Emma JC

Senior
Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Reaction score
3,583
Location
Canada
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
We love beans, in all forms. Today I am going to "crock pot" another batch and it will likely be mostly Navy and Great Northern beans, with a few pinto mixed in. I was at the grocery store yesterday and they are out of the small cans of breakfast beans that I normally buy and the Heinz version is $1.99 now and I am not paying that when I can make my own. I usually buy a bunch when they are .99 or less.

I put onions and jalapeno in the crock pot with the beans and then put extra water in so that I have lots of liquid leftover as it makes excellent bean soup.

So good to hear you are doing better!

Emma JC
 

Hog

Practitioner
Joined
May 4, 2019
Reaction score
435
Age
53
Location
Phoenix
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan newbie
I have a few possible suggestions for your vegan journey.

01. Make sure you eat comfort vegan food. Eat vegan cheese, hotdogs, hamburgers, and ice cream. Make sure you cover the three essential food groups: oil, salt, and sugar. This way you may never feel like you gave up anything in the first place.

02. I watch numerous animal abuse videos as a form of repulsion therapy. I completely understand if you do not want to watch animal abuse videos. I would never force my family to watch that stuff. But, it worked for me.

03. Make sure you forgive yourself should you eat nonvegan food. It is about the animal and not infinite purity.

My doctor constantly complained about my blood numbers before I went vegan. I told him, "Save the lecture for people who have a reason to live. I eat for my emotional health. I think you will still have enough patients to make a decent living even if I am dead." After I went vegan, my blood numbers got better all by themselves. The best part is that I do not have to listen to the doctor constantly complain.
 
  • Like
Reactions: NYC Gardener

edde

Devotee
Joined
Jun 10, 2020
Reaction score
47
Age
20
Location
Nairobi
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
Becoming a strict vegan is never an easy ride mainly because of two reasons. One is social pressure and the other is formed habit.

Vegans are usually regarded as weird largely due to their unconventional food choices. So when you go fully vegan you may be "alienated" by your non-vegan friends and family. To maintain such close relationships you may be forced to be partially vegan.

Many people transition to veganism when they are adults. This means that most of us grow up eating animal products which forms habit. If from when you were kid you loved bacon or cheese it may be hard for you to forgo such foodstuffs.

The key to going from veganish to vegan is starting small. Start by eliminating one animal product after another. In my case I started by avoiding meat, then milk and eggs later on. Doing so gives you the chance to adopt to a vegan diet without craving too much for animal source foods.