Cellular Agriculture - why?

fzjohnson

Forum Practitioner
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Reaction score
25
Age
49
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
http://www.memphismeats.com

Hi.
I'm not sure I understand the logic behind "cellular agriculture" (in vitro meat products) and how one of the entrepreneurs (web address above) can love meat and be vegetarian.
I understand the (eventual) lower carbon footprint and the reduced harm to livestock, but presumably these cultures need growth factors that can't all be synthetic. And if there are synthetic or natural growth factors added to cultures, what will the health benefits be in the long run?
I'm not saying, "don't try" because I believe in the merits of innovation. I just don't fully understand the logic. It feels like one of those questions people ask that has nothing to do with the actual topic ... you know, like a distraction.
Any thoughts, anyone? Maybe you can help me "get it".
Thanks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Damo

Sally

Forum Legend
Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Reaction score
150
Location
Isle of Wight UK
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
They could be growing human meat, who knows? It's a bit like hydroponic plant growing, no earth. I don't know, if it is all just chemicals does it matter if the plant grows in earth or not, or the meat is grown by an animal eating grass or in a laboratory. Is it wrong or is it just too different to get one's head around. I think it would be helpful if one didn't think it was a good thing to kill to eat. Maybe it is the future.
 
W

winter.frost

Guest
No, you're right fzjohnson, this really isn't a good idea. They are trying to address an environmental issue, but not a health or psychological one.

THIS, on the other hand, might have something to it: http://www.impossiblefoods.com/

Sally, I'm sure we don't have to call experimental omnivorous scientists cannibals per se :p Anyway, growing human cells is already being done. Whether in the case of the study of diseases, IVF, or in the business of growing organ donations or even customising skin grafts. It depends on where you draw a line but I don't think anyone needs to worry about 'human meat' whatever the case.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Damo

Damo

Forum Legend
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Reaction score
243
Age
29
Location
UK
We love meat. But like most Americans, we don’t love the many negative side effects of conventional meat production: environmental degradation, a slew of health risks, and food products that contain antibiotics, fecal matter, pathogens, and other contaminants.

I think they're missing a fairly obvious "side effect"

Lab grown meat has always gave me the creeps I mean just the sound of "lab grown" feels so unnatural and I really like the sound of natural or the closest to natural can be when it comes to food, I'm sure others will feel the same way.
 
OP
OP
fzjohnson

fzjohnson

Forum Practitioner
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Reaction score
25
Age
49
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
Yes, I've seen impossible foods before but their marketing doesn't explain exactly what they're doing. Perhaps I missed it? They are obviously doing a massive analysis of the meat and umami flavours - although many of the big flavour companies in New Jersey probably have this information it's unlikely they'd provide it to the commons.

Are they (Impossible Foods) engineering plants to express the meat proteins? Or are they targeting plant proteins with a similar makeup,g. LegHb for blood, and mass producing, then combining those?

Again, if it's the former (engineering), I don't wish to staunch innovation but isn't this just a case of trying too hard? Why not put the R&D money into bringing back native/functional foods and/or experimenting with new taste sensations?Plants like the Miracle berry (makes every thing taste sweet) are fascinating ... there must be so many more out there that companies like this could research.
 

Sally

Forum Legend
Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Reaction score
150
Location
Isle of Wight UK
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
The meat industry is massive. My husband says he'd be vegetarian if there was a good alternative to meat. I buy meat substitutes for him, but we haven't found one he likes yet so something like the Impossible burger might work for him. As for me, I'm happy with vegetables that don't look or taste like meat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: fzjohnson
OP
OP
fzjohnson

fzjohnson

Forum Practitioner
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Reaction score
25
Age
49
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
The meat industry is massive. My husband says he'd be vegetarian if there was a good alternative to meat. I buy meat substitutes for him, but we haven't found one he likes yet so something like the Impossible burger might work for him. As for me, I'm happy with vegetables that don't look or taste like meat.
You make a good point, Sally. I have heard that taking iron tablets as one transitions off meat onto veggies, make life easier and lessens the cravings. Haven't tried it myself though.
 
W

winter.frost

Guest
No I don't believe so, not really. But then we are both thinking like ethical vegans who probably get a little bit turned off by plants that bleed. I know for a fact that there are plenty of omnivores who consider themselves wannabe environmentalists that are very excited about this product. And if they are, I am too. Anything that will get them willingly onto the wagon.
 

Sally

Forum Legend
Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Reaction score
150
Location
Isle of Wight UK
Lifestyle
  1. Vegan
I have heard that taking iron tablets as one transitions off meat onto veggies, make life easier and lessens the cravings. Haven't tried it myself though.

I've always suffered from iron deficiency, my doctor advised me to keep iron tablets on hand at all times. My friend put me onto Hempiness Protein Powder from The Hemp Shop

http://www.thehempshop.co.uk/product-187.htm

I find that a flat dessert spoonful a day keeps me well, I mix it into hummous and I don't notice it, otherwise it is a bit earthy in taste. When I run out I have to go back to my iron tablets and sometimes vegan multivitamins. A small tub lasts me about three months in the fridge.