How do you really feel?

Simon

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Hello,
Not a big contributor to this forum but as it's the first day of a new year thought I'd ask this question.
I'm an ethical vegan of 2 years and 7 months.
My personal activism is my instagram account, over 600 posts mostly about veganism, just reposts really, but trying to do my bit. My sister in law said to me the other day that she is gonna give Veganuary a go because of my instagram activism, which I was bowled over by. Her dad worked in the meat market so it is a big thing for her.
However, I've just seen a post about how you can cure/improve digestive issues on a vegan diet, which I had to comment on because my digestive problems only started when I went vegan.
Prior to that I considered myself having a cast-iron constitution.
I'm an active self employed dog daycarer/walker/boarder and part time gardener(1 day a week).
4 days a week I walk at least 10 miles with the dogs and the 5th day gardening is literally spent on my feet for 8 hours(I even take the dogs along and walk them at lunch time). Been doing this for the last 10 years.
I'm 51, 5'11" 70kg.
Family history of hyper tension(mine has always been borderline, not needing medication).
I also had a thriving online handmade leather items business which I closed down, when I made the shift, which was the hardest thing to do.
6 months into veganism, I was worried about discolouration and swelling of one of my ankles when I spent a long time on my feet, which because of my work was virtually everyday.
A friend mentioned diabetes so I spoke to my GP, had blood tests done, which came back negative for Diabetes but I was told that I had Hypothyroidism and would need to take the synthetic thyroid hormone, thyroxine for the rest of my life, which all came as a bit of a shock.
I had been waiting for the perceived energy boost and general well being that came hand in hand with adopting the vegan diet, but it never happened and now I had been diagnosed as having a life long chronic illness.
I did ask if veganism had caused the hypothyroidism and was told no, but if I'm honest a nagging doubt remains, as I keep on reading about the negatives of soya on thyroid health.
I cook 85% of my food from scratch, don't really like any of the vegan processed stuff I've tried.
I love the diet, and have embraced cooking properly, to the point it has become a passion.
I do use oil and plant based butter as well as salt and drink a beer with my evening meal as I have always done.
Pretty sure I cover all the bases, nutrient wise.
I supplement with B12 and take a tablespoon of ground flaxseed on my oatmeal most mornings.
I follow all the usual suspects on social media and have recently been aware that a few of the main protagonists have been mentioning digestive issues.
I've also been seeing quite a few vegans turning away from the diet because of health problems, although they do mostly seem to be the extremists, who have tried all the various forms of a PBD.
I replied on the instagram post about correcting digestive problems, that my problems only started with veganism and that if I had adopted a plant based diet for health reasons, I probably would have gone back to eating meat by now.
I have tried digestive enzymes and am now trying celery juice, recommended by that Medical Medium bloke(who I think is probably a shill, but I thought for the sake of 50p a day outlay, I might as well give it a go).
What I would really like to know is how do YOU honestly feel eating a plant based diet?
Apart from the digestive issues and hypothyroidism, my hypertension has not improved as expected.
In all honesty I would say my energy is reduced and I feel that I have lost some muscle mass and strength, my weight has remained the same, belly has got somewhat wider.
I was a keen weekend cyclist (not competitive) and saw my performance drop as well.
In the last 6 months I have noticed my joints becoming stiffer and sore, I feel like an old man in the mornings. My leg muscles feel constantly tight, just like they used to after a heavy work out, years ago.
Being concerned, I mentioned all this to my GP when I had to have my yearly blood test for the Hypothyroidism.
I was concerned that perhaps I was having absorption issues.
Results came back everything OK.
I guess, I would just like some honest feedback.
We would all love for the rest of the world to go vegan and use everything in our arsenal to convince people to see the light.
I've actually been considering eating some fish or maybe getting some eggs from my local city farm, just to see if anything is different, even though I've heard all there is to know about toxins and cholesterol.
I wonder if there is something almost magical about meat, eggs and dairy in very small quantities as consumed by the people that live in the Blue zones.
I listen to the vegan podcasts and hear the experts telling me that the data is all there and anything that says that meat, eggs and dairy is good for us is funded by those industries.
I realise that saying anything negative about the vegan diet is pretty much sacrilege, especially on a vegan forum, but I'd really appreciate some honest feedback.
For your information I'm not an investigative reporter or meat eating shill looking to refute veganism.
My Instagram handle is simopco if you'd like to confirm and send me a dm.
Thanks for reading, look forward to any replies.
 

Emma JC

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I feel amazing, eating a plant based diet, and I eat mostly whole foods and lots and lots of it is starch based.

You are similar in age to me, you are 5 inches taller and you weigh the same amount that I do. Have you ever suspected that you are not eating enough? I do not eat added oils, try to limit added salts and sugars and I do not have a exercise routine at all, if I did then I suspect I would eat even more than I do. I do have wine with my meal on weekends.

Maybe you're not getting the energy boost you are looking for as you have a simple lack of calories? It is hard to tell when you haven't said how much you eat. Cronometer is a way to track your calories used and calories consumed. It might be wise to check it out?

Emma JC
 
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I feel amazing, eating a plant based diet, and I eat mostly whole foods and lots and lots of it is starch based.

You are similar in age to me, you are 5 inches taller and you weigh the same amount that I do. Have you ever suspected that you are not eating enough? I do not eat added oils, try to limit added salts and sugars and I do not have a exercise routine at all, if I did then I suspect I would eat even more than I do. I do have wine with my meal on weekends.

Maybe you're not getting the energy boost you are looking for as you have a simple lack of calories? It is hard to tell when you haven't said how much you eat. Cronometer is a way to track your calories used and calories consumed. It might be wise to check it out?

Emma JC

Thanks for your reply Emma.
Believe me when I say, I eat very well and get all the calories I need.
My weight never fluctuates and has been the same for the last 20 years at least, I consider myself very lucky in that respect seeing that my 4 siblings are all on the heavy side.
I don't restrict calories and eat absolutely everything.
I would have been completely happy with no boost of energy but not very happy with less energy than pre vegan.
I just devoured a pasta bowl of spaghetti with seitan sausage, onions a bag of baby spinach, potatoes, garlic, lemon juice, washed down with a bottle of pale ale. Now sitting down with a cup of British tea and some ginger cookies.
Had a breakfast of oatmeal with some added corn meal topped with mixed berries, dollop of peanut butter, handful of nuts and drizzled with maple syrup.
Light lunch of 2 pieces of toast with homemade butter bean and sun dried tomato/smoked paprika hummus with dill pickles.
I keep hydrated, and supplement. Pretty sure I met my caloric intake for the day.
 

Emma JC

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That does sound like you are eating great meals and yet you said "pretty sure" and that is why cronometer might be useful for you as you would be more sure or you may find that there is something important that you are missing.

I am not suggesting long term usage or counting calories on a regular basis as I believe that that is not beneficial and yet short term it could be helpful, especially as you are athletic.

I hope you are able to find the answers soon and return to optimal health. We are all different and have different needs and yet I can't think of one 'animal product' that would give you any nutrient that you can't get from plant foods. Animal products tend to be more calorie dense and that is why I suggested the counting.

satiety_oil_chicken_vegetables.jpg


Emma JC
 

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I agree with Emma JC. I think your first step is to track your nutrition. Cronometer is great for that. It even prints out a one-page summary that you can bring to your doctor.

I don't know anything about hypothyroidism, but that seems like it might be part of your issues. I would talk in more detail with your doctor. Maybe there are additional blood tests that can be taken. I know my doctor doesn't check for everything he can unless he has a good reason. you know, HMO cost cutting.

But it sounds like something is wrong and I don't think digestive enzymes or celery juice is the answers. Nor the Medical Medium.

Some of the most respected WFPB diets include small portions of meat. I think it's not for health reasons, it's more like the nonvegans won't try the diet without allowing for some meat. but I think the meat is usually about 3 oz a week. I don't think they include dairy. Not sure about eggs. I am now so confused about eggs. Anyway, if you think adding some animal products back in your diet might help, try it. Your personal health is super important.

I kind of doubt there is some magical mystery ingredient missing from your diet. but its possible. Like maybe you have a chromium deficiency or a zinc deficiency. I don't think the blood tests check for every micronutrient. Anyway using chronometer for a week might be able to give your doctor come clues.

Good luck and let us know what happens.
 

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Lou

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After reading Emma's second post, and also agreeing with it I want to double down on the Cronometer sugestion and maybe it's a micronutrient theory. There are some micronutrients that are harder to get on a vegan diet. Or perhaps your hyperthyroidism or its meds interfere with the absorption of one. You said these symptoms only started 6 months into the vegan diet. That could be the amount of time necessary to develop a deficiency. If you can, pester your doctor to give you a more thorough blood screening.

I think a week with Cronometer and then a longer sit down with your Doctor should be steps one and two. Step three could be to see a Registered Dietician. If your doctor prescribes one it can be covered with health insurance. Doctors are notorious for not knowing about nutrition.
 
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That does sound like you are eating great meals and yet you said "pretty sure" and that is why cronometer might be useful for you as you would be more sure or you may find that there is something important that you are missing.

I am not suggesting long term usage or counting calories on a regular basis as I believe that that is not beneficial and yet short term it could be helpful, especially as you are athletic.

I hope you are able to find the answers soon and return to optimal health. We are all different and have different needs and yet I can't think of one 'animal product' that would give you any nutrient that you can't get from plant foods. Animal products tend to be more calorie dense and that is why I suggested the counting.

satiety_oil_chicken_vegetables.jpg


Emma JC

I would've thought that if I was undernourished I'd be losing weight?
As mentioned previously my blood panel came back all good, was also tested for celiac and anaemia.
Everything came back fine.
 
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I agree with Emma JC. I think your first step is to track your nutrition. Cronometer is great for that. It even prints out a one-page summary that you can bring to your doctor.

I don't know anything about hypothyroidism, but that seems like it might be part of your issues. I would talk in more detail with your doctor. Maybe there are additional blood tests that can be taken. I know my doctor doesn't check for everything he can unless he has a good reason. you know, HMO cost cutting.

But it sounds like something is wrong and I don't think digestive enzymes or celery juice is the answers. Nor the Medical Medium.

Some of the most respected WFPB diets include small portions of meat. I think it's not for health reasons, it's more like the nonvegans won't try the diet without allowing for some meat. but I think the meat is usually about 3 oz a week. I don't think they include dairy. Not sure about eggs. I am now so confused about eggs. Anyway, if you think adding some animal products back in your diet might help, try it. Your personal health is super important.

I kind of doubt there is some magical mystery ingredient missing from your diet. but its possible. Like maybe you have a chromium deficiency or a zinc deficiency. I don't think the blood tests check for every micronutrient. Anyway using chronometer for a week might be able to give your doctor come clues.

Good luck and let us know what happens.

Thanks very much Lou.
I would be very surprised if I wasn't hitting all macros and micros, but I guess I've got nothing to lose from trying cronometer.
The last thing I want to do is start eating any animal products again, it's just a case of getting rid of that nagging doubt.
I used to catch and eat Mackerel back in the day and thought about getting some from my local fresh fishmonger or buying half a dozen eggs from a nearby educational small city farm.
 
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After reading Emma's second post, and also agreeing with it I want to double down on the Cronometer sugestion and maybe it's a micronutrient theory. There are some micronutrients that are harder to get on a vegan diet. Or perhaps your hyperthyroidism or its meds interfere with the absorption of one. You said these symptoms only started 6 months into the vegan diet. That could be the amount of time necessary to develop a deficiency. If you can, pester your doctor to give you a more thorough blood screening.

I think a week with Cronometer and then a longer sit down with your Doctor should be steps one and two. Step three could be to see a Registered Dietician. If your doctor prescribes one it can be covered with health insurance. Doctors are notorious for not knowing about nutrition.

To be honest Lou, I wasn't feeling low in energy after 6 months of adopting a vegan diet, I went to see my doctor because of the swollen and discolouration of my ankles and worries about Diabetes.
My current lack of energy and weakness only started around 6 months ago, sorry if I wasn't clear enough, I appreciate I have a tendency to ramble.
I have also struggled with digestion from day one, but having just read the first article that Emma sent me a link to I realise that poor digestion is a symptom of Hypothyroidism.
Also, I'm in the UK so most health issues are dealt with on our National Health service free of charge....if, your doctor considers it worthy of referall.
 
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Emma JC

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I've been thinking about you while I was reheating last night's soup and your described physique reminds me of Ryan from Happy Healthy Vegan... he is over 6 feet and very slim and very athletic and just turned 50, I believe. He starts many/most of his days with a 10 banana smoothie/dates/berries etc and then eats lots of cooked starches and vegetables and fruits throughout the day. That is a lot of calories and yet because of his activity levels and his metabolism he obviously uses them all up. He has also, recently, had his blood tests done and he is very healthy on all levels. I believe he has been vegan for 8 years and he and Angie eat mostly whole foods although they do eat out as they live in the LA area and there are so many options there.

Emma JC
 
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I've been thinking about you while I was reheating last night's soup and your described physique reminds me of Ryan from Happy Healthy Vegan... he is over 6 feet and very slim and very athletic and just turned 50, I believe. He starts many/most of his days with a 10 banana smoothie/dates/berries etc and then eats lots of cooked starches and vegetables and fruits throughout the day. That is a lot of calories and yet because of his activity levels and his metabolism he obviously uses them all up. He has also, recently, had his blood tests done and he is very healthy on all levels. I believe he has been vegan for 8 years and he and Angie eat mostly whole foods although they do eat out as they live in the LA area and there are so many options there.

Emma JC
Thanks Emma,
Yes I watched the recent video Ryan posted regarding his testosterone levels.
I am not athletic just active. My family genetics would suggest that I put on weight easily, but a combination of activity and vanity mean I have managed to maintain an ideal weight the vast majority of my life. I was a fat child, but dropped the weight in puberty and it has stayed off.
I think that if I ate 10 banana smoothies, that weight would very quickly pile on and to be honest I find that sort of diet extreme and unnatural.
My blood test from November came back all good, I have been thinking about talking to my doctor about a blood test for rheumatoid athritis markers.
I have recently been talking to the man whose garden I maintain about health. He too has Hypothyroidism and has been having similar lethargy and aching symptoms for the last few months. He has private medical care so was quickly dealt with. Again he also thought that perhaps his troubles were the start of Rheumatoid Arthritis, but tests came back saying that he was having B12 absorption problems. He is not vegan and a big meat eater. He has been having a course of B12 shots over the last few weeks but tells me they have not made any difference to how he feels...yet.

I'm aware that all my symptoms could be my Hypotyroidism, but my Endocrinologist said that the level Of Hypo I have is sub-clinical and that my issue is one of raised anti-body levels. There is no history of it in my family.
 

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Well you're in your 50s, sorry but your joints don't last forever. I know heavy meat eaters that had knee surgery fresh out of high school because they ran track and played football. My recreation professor last semester just turned 40 and does CrossFit and she eats meat and dairy, and said she started carrying a camp chair in the past few years on backpacking trips because she's more comfortable in a chair than on the ground now that she's older. My point is that eating animal products does NOT save your joints if you are athletic. The more athletic you are, the sooner your joints will go, and I don't think that has much to do with how you eat.

If anything, you seem to be doing okay having made it to middle age before starting to have this issue.

Some suggest supplementing collagen: http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/collagen-supplements-helpful-arthritis/

There are vegetarian/vegan sources of collagen: https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/vegetarians-guide-protein-collagen-healthy-bones/

Also from what I understand the acidity of animal foods actually makes conditions like arthritis worse, not better, and nearly every medicinal food I've seen suggested to remedy it are plant based, things like tart cherry juice, olive oil, broccoli and yes, soy.

The one animal-based food I've seen recommended besides collagen sources are fish for omega 3.

Maybe you need some omega 3 supplements, or eat more flax and walnuts.
 
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Well you're in your 50s, sorry but your joints don't last forever. I know heavy meat eaters that had knee surgery fresh out of high school because they ran track and played football. My recreation professor last semester just turned 40 and does CrossFit and she eats meat and dairy, and said she started carrying a camp chair in the past few years on backpacking trips because she's more comfortable in a chair than on the ground now that she's older. My point is that eating animal products does NOT save your joints if you are athletic. The more athletic you are, the sooner your joints will go, and I don't think that has much to do with how you eat.

If anything, you seem to be doing okay having made it to middle age before starting to have this issue.

Some suggest supplementing collagen: http://blog.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/collagen-supplements-helpful-arthritis/

There are vegetarian/vegan sources of collagen: https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/vegetarians-guide-protein-collagen-healthy-bones/

Also from what I understand the acidity of animal foods actually makes conditions like arthritis worse, not better, and nearly every medicinal food I've seen suggested to remedy it are plant based, things like tart cherry juice, olive oil, broccoli and yes, soy.

The one animal-based food I've seen recommended besides collagen sources are fish for omega 3.

Maybe you need some omega 3 supplements, or eat more flax and walnuts.

Thanks for you response and links, will look into them.
Someone else has also mentioned collagen to me quite recently so I'll definitely check it out.
I eat ground flaxseed with my oatmeal most mornings together witha handful of walnuts and a couple of brazils for selenium.
My OP was really asking how YOU feel eating plantbased?
Has it been all good?
Any Issues at all?
 

Forest Nymph

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Thanks for you response and links, will look into them.
Someone else has also mentioned collagen to me quite recently so I'll definitely check it out.
I eat ground flaxseed with my oatmeal most mornings together witha handful of walnuts and a couple of brazils for selenium.
My OP was really asking how YOU feel eating plantbased?
Has it been all good?
Any Issues at all?

I'm totally fine. In the first month or two I didn't really know what I was doing so ended up eating a lot of potato chips which is funny to me now, they are just really high calorie. I only had the typical caloric issues that causes a lot of people to give up prematurely.

But years later my blood work is according to my doctor like someone half my age i.e. like someone in their late teens. No deficiencies. No health issues. Normal energy.

Soy has to be eaten in insane amounts in order to have any negative effect. The last study I saw said something like twenty servings a day. Unless you binge eat multiple blocks of tofu every day I doubt soy is your problem.
 

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Have you tried stretching? That might help with joint pain and tightened muscles. Even if you wouldn't be very active in your spare time, some warm up in the morning and a cool down in the evening could give you some relief. You can find books at the library and videos on YouTube, if you are interested. Be careful to never strech in a way that feels unconfortable. Some instructors assume that everyone can get in an almost inhuman stretching positions.

My friend also has thyroid problems and her symptoms were indigestion: often vomited after eating, fatigue: couldn't stay active very long periods of time, and had "brain fog". After her diagnose she began gathering information on health, nutrition and so on. On her blog she wrote that vegetables are one cause of chronic illnesses because of the chemicals in them and that humans are designed to be mostly carnivorous. Later she specified that different humans (I suppose that genes play a role in this, like for example people of northern ancestry can handle meat better, than people with southern ancestry) are adapted on different diets.
She was very convincing, using many different sources and making her research well. But I can't find her blog anymore, and it's written in finnish anyway. It was very confusing to read, as I was interested of veganism at that time. She was someone I looked up to, an mother figure for me since my biological mom had been neglectful for the most part of my life, because of her mental and alcohol problems.
I don't know if my friend got better by eating organic, locally grown animals. I'm pretty bad at keeping contacts. But she firmly believed that she was right.

What I have understood is that diet and activity are most important as pre-emptive means, after chronic illness diet and activity help preventing from getting worse, this is the conclusion I have drawn when my mom was diagnosed with high cholesterol. At first she started taking medication and made lifestyle changes, those caused her cholesterol to get in a more healthier level, so the doctor said that in this rate she can stop her medication. Well, she then just stopped taking her medication altogether, even though the doctor hadn't advised that, but still continued with eating healthy and exercising. Then her check up came about and her cholesterol had risen. Thus I think that diet is important, but sometimes diseases might be irreversible. Moms' doctor said that the high cholesterol might be genetic so I'm at risk of developing the same condition as well.

What I can remember from being an omnivore, is that I was almost constantly constipated (too much information, I know) and didn't have much appetite at all. This wasn't because of lack of activity. At the time I was a bicycle reparer which is very physical job where you need strong muscles. I biked to work and back home, everyday about 12 kilometers. After work I would do an exercise and streching. I would also drink a lot of water. I really can't explain why animal based products weren't for my body.

Now that I'm a vegan I'm rarely if ever constipated, I have much better appetite and I find vegetables more palatable, than what I found animal based products before. With veganism I'm able to eat more than ever before in my life, but I also feel more capable to exercise without getting tired. I'm also more health conscious, and try to eat properly, at least most days. I feel more connected with other living beings and I don't feel guilty about animal agriculture anymore. Under the label Vegan I feel as if being a part of a bigger group, since there are so many vegans all around the world. I don't see them, in real life, but this forum is one prove that they are out there. I also feel that I'm doing the best I can to honor the part of the wiccan rede "an ye harm none, do what ye will." I know what I want to do in this life which helps me feel somewhat content.
I countered problems with veganism, after being a couple of months, on a strict diet and exercise plan, to lose weight. I craved for eggs and cheese almost constantly. Turned out that it wasn't veganism that caused my problems, I just didn't get enough calories with my crazy diet.

These are merely anecdotes. My life changes constantly and it's a mess, so I don't have an valid documentation of every change in my physical state or diet. I also consider myself lucky to have been in a good health.

I hope you find the information you need and start feeling better.
 
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betiPT

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Hey Simon,

Sounds like you need a bit of 'me time'. Stop for a moment and enjoy your life; when was the last time you planned a trip to go hiking or exploring?

A little about me: I feel amazing... in my 40s with no aches or pains and full of energy (it makes everyone around me sick LOL). Yesterday I was at the beach with my kids for 5 hours body boarding, after 3 hours of driving I come home to cook food for the family and play catch with my son :)

What do I do?
  • Eat well - unprocessed vegan, this excludes oil and I don't drink coffee
  • Sleep well - I try very hard to get 7-9 hours sleep per night. This is probably the hardest thing for me to do
  • Exercise well - I ensure I engage in Cardio, Resistance and Flexibility training often
  • Have time to myself
  • Give my brain a workout
  • Ensure I get out into nature (camping, beach, bush) just to be out there and appreciate our wonderful lives
I hope this helps (pic just for you below from my camping last week - I guess you know what country I am from :) )

Good luck with everything :)

IMG_5807.jpeg
 
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Forest Nymph

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Have you tried stretching? That might help with joint pain and tightened muscles. Even if you wouldn't be very active in your spare time, some warm up in the morning and a cool down in the evening could give you some relieve. You can find books at the library and videos on YouTube, if you are interested. Be careful to never strech in a way that feels unconfortable. Some instructors assume that everyone can get in an almost inhuman stretching positions.

My friend also has thyroid problems and her symptoms were indigestion: often vomited after eating, fatigue: couldn't stay active very long periods of time, and had "brain fog". After her diagnose she began gathering information on health, nutrition and so on. On her blog she wrote that vegetables are one cause of chronic illnesses because of the chemicals in them and that humans are designed to be mostly carnivorous. Later she specified that different humans (I suppose that genes play a role in this, like for example people of northern ancestry can handle meat better, than people with southern ancestry) are adapted on different diets.
She was very convincing, using many different sources and making her research well. But I can't find her blog anymore, and it's written in finnish anyway. It was very confusing to read, as I was interested of veganism at that time. She was someone I looked up to, an mother figure for me since my biological mom had been neglectful for the most part of my life, because of her mental and alcohol problems.
I don't know if my friend got better by eating organic, locally grown animals. I'm pretty bad at keeping contacts. But she firmly believed that she was right.

What I have understood is that diet and activity are most important as pre-emptive means, after chronic illness diet and activity help preventing from getting worse, this is the conclusion I have drawn when my mom was diagnosed with high cholesterol. At first she started taking medication and made lifestyle changes, those caused her cholesterol to get in a more healthier level, so the doctor said that in this rate she can stop her medication. Well, she then just stopped taking her medication altogether, even though the doctor hadn't advised that, but still continued with eating healthy and exercising. Then her check up came about and her cholesterol had risen. Thus I think that diet is important, but sometimes diseases might be irreversible. Moms' doctor said that the high cholesterol might be genetic so I'm at risk of developing the same condition as well.

What I can remember from being an omnivore, is that I was almost constantly constipated (too much information, I know) and didn't have much appetite at all. This wasn't because of lack of activity. At the time I was a bicycle reparer which is very physical job where you need strong muscles. I biked at work and back home, everyday about 12 kilometers. After work I would do an exercise and streching. I would also drink a lot of water. I really can't explain why animal based products weren't for my body.

Now that I'm a vegan I'm rarely if ever constipated, I have much better appetite and I find vegetables more palatable, than what I found animal based products before. With veganism I'm able to eat more than ever before in my life, but I also feel more capable to exercise without getting tired. I'm also more health conscious, and try to eat properly, at least most days. I feel more connected with other living beings and I don't feel guilty about animal agriculture anymore. Under the label Vegan I feel as if being a part of a bigger group, since there are so many vegans all around the world. I don't see them, in real life, but this forum is one prove that they are out there. I also feel that I'm doing the best I can to honor the part of the wiccan rede "an ye harm none, do as ye will." I know what I want to do in this life which helps me feel somewhat content.
I countered problems with veganism, after being a couple of months, on a strict diet and exercise plan, to lose weight. I craved for eggs and cheese almost constantly. Turned out that it wasn't veganism that caused my problems, I just didn't get enough calories with my crazy diet.

These are merely anecdotes. My life changes constantly and it's a mess, so I don't have an valid documentation of every change in my physical state or diet. I also consider myself lucky to have been in a good health.

I hope you find the information you need and start feeling better.

You seem like an open minded person which is nice, but your friend claiming that vegetables have "chemicals" while animals are better to eat is a complete inversion of the biology concept of bioaccumulation. Bioaccumulation essentially means that toxins increase the farther up the food chain you eat. For example, say vegetables in some cases that aren't organic do have chemicals. No person washes them, but a rabbit eats them. Then a bear eats the rabbit, and some hunter decides to eat bear flesh. The hunter is now consuming ALL of the toxins from not only the vegetables but also the rabbit and the bear. Same applies to sea life and farmed animals. So your friend had it tragically backwards. If her intention was to eat less chemicals she should eat as low on the food chain as possible. Veganism is the cleanest option available.

As for blood type diets, where people claim some thrive on meat and others on vegetables, I object to this idea due to the concept of Blue Zones. Most people in those areas no matter their culture are vegetarian or pescatarian, or eat very small amounts of meat if they do. Seventh Day Adventists make up a huge portion of the blue zone in California and are usually vegetarian or vegan due to their religious beliefs. Yes some people genetically tolerate dairy better, etc but I am not aware of any Blue Zone in the world where the people eat paleo or tons of meat or low carb.
 

StrangeOtter

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@Forest Nymph
I didn't say anything to her, but I felt really bad for her, as she was forced to choose between animals and her own health. I assumed that she felt bad about that situation as well. But now, I understand even less, than the little I understood then. She might have been mistaken, or read the wrong information, that can happen to anyone as the internet is available to anyone and full of contradicting information. She is very intelligent, reads and writes a lot and memorises most of the read information. I know, you didn't say that she wasn't intelligent, but I feel like I have to explain, since I have represented her in a bad light, even though this doesn't matter to you.
I could have made my own research, but I have never been too interested, I just wanted to be vegan and... well, we are all going to die someday...Only after moms diagnose, I did some research and the web pages I read all claimed, that fibre and vegetables are good, when trying to prevent high cholesterol. But I already have much of those both in my diet and I don't even crave white bread or sweets or all that which was deemed bad for cholesterol, so I learned nothing. It's horrible, having to count ones life on medication, but then again, it's good to have that option, after everything else fails.
What you have written and researched, makes sense. Those who have most of their caloric intake from meat, must be minority in modern world.
 
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