Trapped Gas Bloating

Anthonyxj18

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I've been vegan for so many Years 4 now. And the gas and bloating has hit its peak to the point I'm lost and miserable going to docters as we speak but I'm curious if anyone had a past issue with Digestion on a whole foods plant based diet lots of potatoes rice oats. And veggies of course nuts seeds Nut butters not much fat but over 15 percent of my calories is from fat. I'm losing weight and struggling bad.
 

David3

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I've been vegan for so many Years 4 now. And the gas and bloating has hit its peak to the point I'm lost and miserable going to docters as we speak but I'm curious if anyone had a past issue with Digestion on a whole foods plant based diet lots of potatoes rice oats. And veggies of course nuts seeds Nut butters not much fat but over 15 percent of my calories is from fat. I'm losing weight and struggling bad.

Hi Anthony,

Because this is a medical issue, I would encourage you to make an appointment with a Registered Dietitian (RD) who specializes in digestive disorders. Your physician should be able to refer you to a local RD.
 

Emma JC

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hi Anthony

I agree with @David3 and also suggest Cronometer - use it for a week, putting in your foods and activity levels so that you can make sure you are getting enough calories, enough nutrients and vitamins.

Emma JC
 

MoreGreens

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I've been where you are. I have three digestive disorders and had to FODMAP test to figure out why my diet was making me wish I was dead. There's nothing quite like trying your hardest to eat well only for your food to turn your body against you. I learned some of the most beloved vegan foods such as avocado, sweet potato, mushrooms, cauliflower... seitan and pea protein couldn't be a part of my diet.

FODMAP testing is restrictive. It's eight weeks of eating only low fodmap foods then slowly reintroducing potential trigger foods to learn what your body doesn't digest healthfully. I think it's worth it because I now have a life that doesn't revolve around digestive misery. Some people can remove just one group and cure themselves without full testing. I had multiple sensitivities, so I had to do the full testing.

Regardless, here's a list of High and Low Fodmap Foods that might help you recognize what's causing your discomfort, and it's a suggestion beyond 'eat more fiber', which seems to be every doctor's initial advice.

Hope you feel better soon!
 

shyvas

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FODMAP testing is restrictive. It's eight weeks of eating only low fodmap foods then slowly reintroducing potential trigger foods to learn what your body doesn't digest healthfully. I think it's worth it because I now have a life that doesn't revolve around digestive misery. Some people can remove just one group and cure themselves without full testing. I had multiple sensitivities, so I had to do the full testing.

Regardless, here's a list of High and Low Fodmap Foods that might help you recognize what's causing your discomfort, and it's a suggestion beyond 'eat more fiber', which seems to be every doctor's initial advice.
That is a very informative and interesting link:up:. I see that pulses/legumes, wheat and pasta is in the pink area.

Did you find out which types of foods gave you these symptoms ? I also find having those kind of symptoms so very unpleasant. ;)
 
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erwin

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I have Crohn’s and went through the Low FODMAP process with a dietitian. There is an app (that lists all the foods) that you can install in your phone which I use often when not sure. The issue is that the problem does not seem to be static, meaning that foods that used to cause me the symptoms you describe used to bother me and now not, and there are foods that were fine and now not. I have developed a core of foods, all vegan, that I know for a fact that are ok, and only try foods that I am not sure in very small doses. Another strategy that I use, for high fiber foods, I make them soft in a blender, or make a shake, and in the case of beans, I soak them overnight and then I cook them very long. Bottomline - the issue is complicated. Good luck!
 

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MoreGreens

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That is a very informative and interesting link:up:. I see that pulses/legumes, wheat and pasta is in the pink area.

Did you find out which types of foods gave you these symptoms ? I also find having those kind of symptoms so very unpleasant. ;)
I did! Fructans are not my friend. How I sometimes miss onion and garlic! Hing/Asafoetida is a much beloved substitute. Whole wheat products are also out. (Amy's tortillas :sob:) It's unfortunate because I adore Ezekiel bread (and occasionally have a piece, even though I know I'll have to eat extra careful the rest of the day). If I indulge it has to be a like a holiday treat not a weekly reward kind of thing.

Legumes and pulses are a little trickier. Canned/tinned lentils and beans are easiest to digest simply because they're being cooked twice. Navy beans and kidney beans have the worst reputation among the fodmap crowd, and I find red lentils the gentlest. Although, it's different for each person and as @erwin said above tolerance to high fodmap foods can change. If I watch portion size and make sure to pair them with fodmap free foods, I can enjoy any legumes or pulses without consequence. (losing them was my greatest fear going into fodmap testing)

The most interesting thing about fodmap sensitivities is you have to be careful not to stack. I'm particularly sensitive to fructans (wheat/garlic/onion), sorbitol (cabbage/avocado/apple) and mannitol (cauliflower/mushroom/celery). If I added celery to soup, assuming I limited the celery to about 10 grams I'd be fine. But, if I added celery and mushrooms then I'd have stacked two mannitols and I'd get ill. If I dared to add a couple of seitan strips as well then I'd get very ill and likely stay ill for a couple of days.

Learning how to add in naughties without stacking is the hardest part of establishing a diverse diet, and the people who enjoy experimenting as well as keeping records are the ones who benefit the most from the testing. Also, I second the Monash food app to anyone who knows they need to adjust diet to control their digestive system. It's the only app that I've ever purchased, and it's paid for itself countless times.
 
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shyvas

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I did! Fructans are not my friend. How I sometimes miss onion and garlic! Hing/Asafoetida is a much beloved substitute. Whole wheat products are also out. (Amy's tortillas :sob:) It's unfortunate because I adore Ezekiel bread (and occasionally have a piece, even though I know I'll have to eat extra careful the rest of the day). If I indulge it has to be a like a holiday treat not a weekly reward kind of thing.

Legumes and pulses are a little trickier. Canned/tinned lentils and beans are easiest to digest simply because they're being cooked twice. Navy beans and kidney beans have the worst reputation among the fodmap crowd, and I find red lentils the gentlest. Although, it's different for each person and as @erwin said above tolerance to high fodmap foods can change. If I watch portion size and make sure to pair them with fodmap free foods, I can enjoy any legumes or pulses without consequence. (losing them was my greatest fear going into fodmap testing)

The most interesting thing about fodmap sensitivities is you have to be careful not to stack. I'm particularly sensitive to fructans (wheat/garlic/onion), sorbitol (cabbage/avocado/apple) and mannitol (cauliflower/mushroom/celery). If I added celery to soup, assuming I limited the celery to about 10 grams I'd be fine. But, if I added celery and mushrooms then I'd have stacked two mannitols and I'd get ill. If I dared to add a couple of seitan strips as well then I'd get very ill and likely stay ill for a couple of days.

Learning how to add in naughties without stacking is the hardest part of establishing a diverse diet, and the people who enjoy experimenting as well as keeping records are the ones who benefit the most from the testing. Also, I second the Monash food app to anyone who knows they need to adjust diet to control their digestive system. It's the only app that I've ever purchased, and it's paid for itself countless times.
Thank you for taking so much time to give such a detailed explanation. It certainly does look like detective work to find the culprit(s). It must be difficult to be sensitive to so many different foods that are used when making certain dishes. I can also relate to some of those you listed e.g. beans, lentils, onions,cabbage family and soya which I don't think you listed. I haven't noticed the difference between tinned and dried beans. Lentils especially red ones are the kinder ones. However, I prefer green lentils. :unamused:

I have counteracted the onion problem by mostly using onion powder instead of a whole onion when making chillis or stews. Same goes for garlic as I'm not keen on the taste or smell so I use a sprinkle of garlic powder.
I also eat beans less often and try and make portions smaller which isn't always easy. Happily that I have no problem with seitan as it's a huge source of protein for me.

Not eating too many of the culprits during the same meal or during the course of the day, is an excellent tip.:up:

I will look into the link in more detail. :)
 
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MoreGreens

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Thank you for taking so much time to give such a detailed explanation. It certainly does look like detective work to find the culprit(s). It must be difficult to be sensitive to so many different foods that are used when making certain dishes. I can also relate to some of those you listed e.g. beans, lentils, onions,cabbage family and soya which I don't think you listed. I haven't noticed the difference between tinned and dried beans. Lentils especially red ones are the kinder ones. However, I prefer green lentils. :unamused:

I have counteracted the onion problem by mostly using onion powder instead of a whole onion when making chillis or stews. Same goes for garlic as I'm not keen on the taste or smell so I use a sprinkle of garlic powder.
I also eat beans less often and try and make portions smaller which isn't always easy. Happily that I have no problem with seitan as it's a huge source of protein for me.

Not eating too many of the culprits during the same meal or during the course of the day, is an excellent tip.:up:

I will look into the link in more detail. :)
I'm happy to discuss digestive health because so many keep quiet out of embarrassment. I had some hard years and wouldn't wish them on anyone. Sharing what I know, so others can have a better quality of life, is the least I can do to pay back the people who helped me.

It is detective work. You have to know not only your body but also your food. Before I stopped eating cheese I knew that I could eat 32g of cheddar but not 34g! Sometimes it feels like a burden, but time and effort are.

I agree onion and garlic powder are much kinder than their whole food versions, and I do sneak them into some things. Hummus and guacamole wouldn't be the same without a hint of garlic, and it's not like I can have more than a spoonful anyway!

Being sensitive to galactans, and a lot of people are, is tough because you want a side of beans not a spoonful as a garnish. I think only lentils have a safe serving that's anywhere near what most people would want and then it's only canned lentils. Canned are safe to 45g (1/2c for the US folk) and boiled from dry they're safe to 23g. It's a blessing that you like seitan. Tempeh is my safe protein of choice, and I'd be lost without it. Speaking of, I did skip over soya. It's complicated within an already complicated system. This link has a chart that explains it well, and the site has some good tummy-friendly recipes.

I hope this thread helps you!
 
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