US The Everything Thanksgiving Thread

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shyvas

shyvas

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Happy Thanksgiving. We are having cocktails and nibbles at my cousin s place and then going on to
the country club for a meal at 2 pm. The weather is lovely and warm and we will be eating outside.
My very first TG meal.:)
 

peacefulveglady

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Happy Thanksgiving
My Thankgiving was stressful could not clean kitchen last night on time got warn out. My sisters are not around for Thanksgiving. I think next Thanksgiving I will do a full vegan one since it was just my husband and I.
 

ewomack

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Thanksgiving isn't a holiday that I particularly care for overall, but I continue to celebrate it with family without any complaints. It remains one of the few days in the year that makes me a "flexitarian." My family has no interest in veganism and I'm fine with that. Also, my parents are getting up there in years. They want to have a traditional turkey meal on this day with family, so I do play along for their sake. I found it interesting that, right before eating, someone said that if they really liked turkey they would eat it more during the year, but they don't. I'm going to put that on a neuron for future use.

I did eat turkey today. So this post is both my confessional and my show of being a "flexible vegan" for certain rare occasions. My parents don't, and pretty much can't, cook anymore, so we went to a restaurant that had three choices: turkey, prime rib and walleye. I had the turkey. Sorry, turkeys. I mean no offense. I can no longer stomach beef, so it was the least offensive option. It was the first time I've eaten any meat in probably months. I honestly don't remember the last time I did so. For all I know, this could have been the first time I've eaten meat this entire year. I eat it on occasions like this maybe at most two or three times a year. Once in a great while on a road trip I'll find myself in a place with no vegan options and I'll have to succumb, but those situations have thankfully become much less common.

If people could at least start by cutting down on meat, things could slowly improve. It's situations like the one described above that make it hard for a lot of people to become 100% vegan 24/7. All or nothing is simply too much for most people. I encourage my family to cut down on meat when I can, but I don't expect them to ever go vegan, or even vegetarian. It won't happen. Perhaps a better way to make some headway on the eating meat issue is to encourage people to start by cutting back. Start by eating meat for only half of the week's meals. Once people try it and feel that they aren't trapped into going all of the way without getting shamed, they may go further all on their own. Sadly, I don't think the entire world going vegan is realistic. I would like to think it's possible, but I know too many stubborn meat eaters to believe it. But convincing people to cut back, or at least to try some meat substitutes for some meals (some are extremely good), sounds like a more reasonable and feasible starting place to evangelize from. Why? Because if people feel that the only way to be vegan is to be 100% vegan, many people will face a situation like the one above and think "going all the way isn't for me" and potentially lapse back into carnivorous habits. I would rather see a world of people who eat less, or far less, meat than a world that keeps eating meat because the expectations for being a "true vegan" are set too high.

These thoughts passed through my mind today as I ate turkey for the first time since last Thanksgiving. I know, at least, that I won't lapse back into eating meat regularly, or even once in a while, because I have set realistic standards for myself. For these reasons, I also don't feel like a failure for eating turkey today. I would have rather not done so, but standing up, pounding my fist and berating my family for eating meat would have just turned into a lose-lose situation for everyone. They would blame veganism for turning their family member into a dogmatic ranting lunatic and I would just alienate people who I don't want to alienate. And it would not change them. All I can do is tell them that I make an exception for this holiday and hope that it at least makes them think. They know that I eat pretty much no meat at all and that I'm bending the rules for the holiday. All I can hope is that my small sacrifice communicates something.
 

silva

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@ewomack -- your story is one vegan and AR folks truly need to understand. Ending animal use doesn't need to be an emotional, or woke response. There are too many reasons to stop using animals for food. People need to wake up to how subsidized the industry is and how much our tax dollars are used to continue to keep it cheap in stores.
Health wise animal products are a leading contributer to preventable disease

All to often I hear vegans being all or nothing, whether critical of those eating processed food that vegan for ethics, or the ethical vegans criticizing those doing their best to reduce consumption

I want to real and normalize meals that don't have animal products,and getting animal products out of things were it's nothing but an addition, like buttery spreads, mayo, chocolate, gelatin as stabilizer.......