US The Everything Thanksgiving Thread-2020/1

Lou

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The rest of the world may be going to hell in a hand basket, but here is some good news just for us at what IMHO was the least vegan day of the year.




 

silva

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Happy day off (hopefully?) and special meal day!
 

VeganRachel

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Hi, my Giving thanks day is simple. I was invited to someon'es house through someone else. She has thanksgiving
for those who are alone at the time, which is very kind. However, the though of bringing my own food, telling her
I won't eat hers' (no offense), and watching/smelling what others eat (which is their right) make me uncomfy. My
goal is NOT to socially isolate myself, honesty, but that is what occurs. So, I make a choice and stay away from that offer.
I wanted to volunteer to feed the homeless but was unable to find any people doing that service.
I will have a simple meal of a large salad and some baked sweet potatoes. namaste'.
 

SuicideBlonde

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VeganRachel

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Happy day off (hopefully?) and special meal day!
Thanks for sharing!. "Thanksgiving" is not a happy event for native americans. It is a reminder of their oppression and slaughter
by the colonialists and those who wanted their land. I would rather call it giving thanks day for all of our blessings and loved
ones and to appreciate them (not a day to celebrate a dead turkey). Over 40 million turkeys are raised and slaughtered every
'thanksgiving'. Peace and love, rachel
 
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silva

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Vegan Turkey Roast (Shreddable Seitan With Skin) My turkey
Apple Pear Pie with Cardamom and Ginger | Foodal pie
My turkey was super good. I skipped some of the steps and just mixed and baked it. So flavorful. My pie was very, very liquidy at the bottom. Tasted wonderful, but so much liquid.
Lots of food, I was the only vegetarian, always. My family at least tells me if they put any sort of meats or meat product in the food.
She took Malins recipe Seitan Kitchen, and left out the corn, and changed the cooking method :dismay:. I'm just miffed because it's been my personal favorite for years! It is a fussier recipe I reserve for holiday time. I stretch the 'skin' part much thinner, and it comes out amazing after the oven

That pie sounds good, I like cardamom, but don't have any

I made a cornbread stuffing which was different. It went well with the cranberry sauce.
Mushrooms and green bean casserole, which came together so easily with the starch I had frozen! (from making washed flour seitan)
The seitan I referenced above, and a garlic foccacia that was just too much!
 

VeganRachel

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Nut roast was too nutty for me--but what if you combined it with seitan?
I think I'll just do a seitan roll around stuffing.
Hi again. Years ago i tried having a tofurky a few times. It was like eating salty rubber to me and needed cranberry sauce to
taste better. I know some love it and look forward to eating it. I also used to consume soy hot dogs and even seitan wheat. Too
heavy for me now. I have however made tofu pumpkin pie and thought it was quite good, but it can be made without tofu as well.
Now I eat mostly raw. There are recipes for raw nut loafs, raw pumpkin pie and raw apple pie, and those are a much better option.
 
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shyvas

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I love the nut roast, but I've had it for several holidays and I'm thinking of trying to make a stuffed holiday roast or something. I haven't quite decided. I need to find a recipe that doesn't take forever (the ones I've seen are kind of involved, with a lot of waiting and multiple cooking steps) and do a dry run to see whether I'll actually like it. Gaz Oakley has one that's wrapped in vegan bacon (which I would skip), but the actual roast looks really good. I will see. I've never tried the store-bought holiday roasts, so I'm not even sure I whether I like them, haha. The price has always put me off.

Nothing beats a nut roast for a special celebration dinner. I don t think that any shop bought seitan roast is as good as it looks, especially when you see the list of ingredients.
 
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silva

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I missed this yesterday.

I absolutely love Billie Eilish! She's on my playlist

Nothing beats a nut roast for a special celebration dinner. I don t think that any shop bought seitan roast is as good as it looks, especially when you see the list of ingredients.
I'm not a fan of nut roasts, I just like nuts.
I agree on the packaged seitan- homemade is better when you find that sweet spot
 

Lou

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This is a nice piece of writing. Maybe the best I've seen in VegNews.

Here are some of the my favorite lines from the article.

There are others we celebrate, because, let’s face it, as a species, we’re inherently indulgent. And, lest we forget, our sacred corporations need holidays, too.​
But for all the pomp that July 4th brings, Thanksgiving, our other most notably American celebration, is subdued. It’s the somber yin to that explosive summer yang.​
The turkey, it seemed, had another destiny altogether: the symbolic sacrament of America’s stolen land.​
If you grew up with a double-X chromosome assignment, it’s likely you were called to or felt obliged to spend much of Thanksgiving in the kitchen.​
An animal centerpiece is not unique to Thanksgiving; most meals still include meat in some form. Loins and roasts, whole chickens, and whole fish are commonly placed at the center of dinner tables—especially those in celebration. But there’s something about that Thanksgiving turkey, all dressed up in her basted demise. All those autumnal sides placed around her like offerings at an altar. It’s the stuffing bursting out of her from head to tail, those featherless wings tucked up neatly alongside her breasts as if she willfully sat down and sacrificed herself for our feasting.​
What’s evident in the Thanksgiving turkey, more than our obsession with burgers or even steak, is the wholeness, the undeniable entity now soulless and rubbed with sage.​
there’s no moral or religious impetus to eat Thanksgiving turkey. No one angers the gods or sleights ancestors by skipping the meat. Perhaps that makes the killing of more than 50 million Thanksgiving turkeys this year feel even more morally bankrupt. The sacrifice is only to our highly redacted history books—the Thanksgiving chapter already marred with injustice.​

OK, I could keep going. But you get the idea.
 
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PTree15

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Nothing beats a nut roast for a special celebration dinner. I don t think that any shop bought seitan roast is as good as it looks, especially when you see the list of ingredients.
I agree. I'm sure I wouldn't enjoy them as much as I do the nut loaf. It's so delicious.
 

silva

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This is a nice piece of writing. Maybe the best I've seen in VegNews.

Here are some of the my favorite lines from the article.

There are others we celebrate, because, let’s face it, as a species, we’re inherently indulgent. And, lest we forget, our sacred corporations need holidays, too.​
But for all the pomp that July 4th brings, Thanksgiving, our other most notably American celebration, is subdued. It’s the somber yin to that explosive summer yang.​
The turkey, it seemed, had another destiny altogether: the symbolic sacrament of America’s stolen land.​
If you grew up with a double-X chromosome assignment, it’s likely you were called to or felt obliged to spend much of Thanksgiving in the kitchen.​
An animal centerpiece is not unique to Thanksgiving; most meals still include meat in some form. Loins and roasts, whole chickens, and whole fish are commonly placed at the center of dinner tables—especially those in celebration. But there’s something about that Thanksgiving turkey, all dressed up in her basted demise. All those autumnal sides placed around her like offerings at an altar. It’s the stuffing bursting out of her from head to tail, those featherless wings tucked up neatly alongside her breasts as if she willfully sat down and sacrificed herself for our feasting.​
What’s evident in the Thanksgiving turkey, more than our obsession with burgers or even steak, is the wholeness, the undeniable entity now soulless and rubbed with sage.​
there’s no moral or religious impetus to eat Thanksgiving turkey. No one angers the gods or sleights ancestors by skipping the meat. Perhaps that makes the killing of more than 50 million Thanksgiving turkeys this year feel even more morally bankrupt. The sacrifice is only to our highly redacted history books—the Thanksgiving chapter already marred with injustice.​

OK, I could keep going. But you get the idea.
Thanksgiving has always been so focused on roasting a bird no one much ate other than in deli slices. It's always had the reputation of being hard to cook, the thing of comedy sitcoms. Too big for the oven, undercooked, being dropped on the floor or snatched by dogs. The gizzard bag left inside. Just taking up way too much room when so many other foods were being cooked, competing for oven room
It seems the most criticized food on the menu, but obligatory.
It's also the most featured on the turkey farms. News would have interviews with the farmers standing amongst the crowded birds, discussing how many would be slaughtered.
Remember Sarah Palins interview standing in front of turkeys having their necks slit?
I think it really gets people to think.
My family always complained about it, while loving all the sides. To me it is the very easiest time to become vegetarian