Nutrition & Diet The Dairy Thread

Lou

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What? Wait! You ask, What is a dairy thread doing in the VF.

Well, in the past I've had news about strictly dairy things. Dairy farmers, dairies, and other milk related news. But I never knew where to put them.
From now on I'll put them here.

For years I've been interested in human evolution. And the whole lactase thing is a great story in human evolution. but its about to be revised.


In every mammalian species, females produce milk to feed their young. The nursing babies digest the milk with the help of an enzyme called lactase, which cuts milk sugar into easily absorbed fragments. When the young mammals are weaned, they stop making lactase. After all, why waste energy making an enzyme you no longer need?​
But it is common for our species to keep consuming milk into adulthood. What’s more, about one-third of people carry genetic mutations that allow them to produce lactase throughout their lives, making it easier to digest milk.​
Scientists have long suspected that dairy consumption and the persistence of lactase rose together in human history. When people started herding cattle and other livestock some 10,000 years ago, the theory went, those with a mutation for lactase persistence gained a new source of calories and protein. People without the mutation, in contrast, became sick when they tried to consume milk and so did not take advantage of the new milk supply.​
But a new study of ancient human DNA and milk-drenched pottery shards suggests that the traditional story does not hold up.​
Dr. Evershed and his colleagues found that Europeans were consuming milk without lactase for thousands of years, despite the misery from gas and cramping it might have caused. The scientists argue that the lactase mutation only became important to survival when Europeans began enduring epidemics and famines: During those periods, their poor health would have exacerbated gastric distress, leading to life-threatening diarrhea.​
 
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very interesting information

I wonder if it is possible to make 'formula' from human breast milk and if yes, why has no one done this so far. You could donate breast milk like people donate blood. Is that just weird?

I do know that there are wet nurses and the like but this could address a pretty big market.

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com
 
very interesting information

I wonder if it is possible to make 'formula' from human breast milk and if yes, why has no one done this so far. You could donate breast milk like people donate blood. Is that just weird?

I do know that there are wet nurses and the like but this could address a pretty big market.

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com


Formula from human breast milk? um. I think if you have human breast milk you don't need formula.

also not sure what this has to do with the topic in the article.

Mammal babies, including human ones can digest lactose.
 
very interesting information

I wonder if it is possible to make 'formula' from human breast milk and if yes, why has no one done this so far. You could donate breast milk like people donate blood. Is that just weird?

I do know that there are wet nurses and the like but this could address a pretty big market.

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com
don't know how widespread this is, but yes, you can donate breastmilk:
 
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First off, a little digression. When I was 14 I thought science had the potential to solve all our problems.

I'm not as much convinced of that as I used to be but still today I find technological solutions seductive.

We have all kinds of non dairy alternatives to dairy milk. In fact, IMHO soy milk is better in every way (including personal health) but one. People seem to like the taste of cow's milk better.

So maybe synthetic milk is the solution to the dairy dilemma.

 
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First off, a little digression. When I was 14 I thought science had the potential to solve all our problems.

I'm not as much convinced of that as I used to be but still today I find technological solutions seductive.

We have all kinds of non dairy alternatives to dairy milk. In fact, IMHO soy milk is better in every way (including personal health) but one. People seem to like the taste of cow's milk better.

So maybe synthetic milk is the solution to the dairy dilemma.

I've never warmed to the taste of soy milk just by itself, but I use it in smoothies, cooking and baking. It's great for all of that. I love the taste of almond milk much better. That I can drink on its own. And I like almond milk in iced coffee and cereal. And it makes a tasty hot chocolate.
 
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I loved cheese but always thought dairy milk was nasty, so I would not be interested in lab made milk-
 
I've heard many people say lab made, gmo's, and faux meats, will cause dna to interact with human dna and change humans
 
Milk Lettuce

Back to the "science saves the day/science kills us all" theme.

There is this in the news. but before I get into the specific news article the story is in the Israeli innovation News Site NoCamels. The NoCamels banner is a bit of a nod and a wink to the popular misconception that Israel is a barren dessert populated by camels.

(I never heard of it before today)

Anyway what I gleaned is that they have genetically modified lettuce to produce casein when it is given a certain fertilizer. Lettuce is mostly water so they get a high yield of "lettuce milk". Plus lettuce grows real fast. They can harvest a crop in less than a month. They add a bunch of other stuff to make it taste like milk. They hope to develop a way to turn lettuce milk into cheese.

There is a huge and growing demand for methods of producing animal products, without animals, as evidenced, for example, by the popularity of plant-based meat and fish products and the development of “real” steak grown from cells in a lab.

“We are familiar with the problem of sustainability in our food supply chain and especially around animal-based food products,” says Lutzky.​
“Eighty per cent of the world’s agriculture is used for feeding animals. The food industry is constantly looking for new ways to make products that have always been produced by animals.”​
“There are many alternative dairy products from plants but there is no other company producing milk, casein or milk proteins in plants in this way and especially not in lettuce.”​

 
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Thanks for sharing. My belief is that milk is a perfect healthy growth stimulating food, FOR BABIES OF A SPECIES.
We are the only animal that convinces ourselves that we need "milk" from another species, after we are weaned.
Humans are addicted to cows milk and products made from it. Lactase, whatever, I still think humans have no
need for animal milk. We do not need the fat, cholesterol, or hormones within it. Human babies and toddlers get anemic from
drinking cow milk, that shows us it is unnatural for humans to consume. I know that many say raw milk is different.
I know pasteurization is not healthy and changes the structure of milk. But milk is a growth promoting substance and
only babies need that massive growth. I still think even raw milk consumption is unnatural for humans (except drinking
human milk). But many disagree with me and make the choice to think raw milk is necessary. When cows produce milk
it is for THEIR calves to drink, not for humans. The natural life for a cow is 20+ years, yet in the factory dairy industry they
suffer to possibly make it to 4 years old, even raw dairy cows typically only survive to age 6 or so. We force them to produce milk for us
and take their calf away from them after birth. The dairy industry also considers male calves, garbage, because they cannot be forced
to produce milk, and they are mercilessly slaughtered. Considering half of all calves born are male, thats' a lot of dead male calves. Just
because the cows are not immediately killed to make milk, and the laying hens are not immediately killed to make eggs, does not
mean they are not suffering and are happy to be slaughtered after their "usefullness" is worthless. Here is
a wonderful short video revealing the dairy industry. There is also one by Erin about eggs. cheers.
 
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I've heard many people say lab made, gmo's, and faux meats, will cause dna to interact with human dna and change humans
I definitely get why people would be concerned with this at first thought. But we consume food with non-human DNA all the time- some of it raw, which I suppose would mean the DNA is intact, not denatured by the heat of cooking. Still, I suppose it might be difficult to predict all the effects of a truly new technology.
 
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But we consume food with non-human DNA all the time-

Heck. the only food I eat is non-human.
I haven't eaten any people in years. :)

However, there may be some actual concerns about that. but it can't be that significant People who eat frog legs don't become amphibious. people the eat fowl don't grow feathers.
 
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So Danone is setting some goals and maybe going to take some measures to reduce the GHG methane.

I haven't read or even heard of Grist before. I thought this was a great piece of reporting.
First it details some of the strategies that might be used to reduce methane production, reducing methane production in cows, capturing the methane, and manure management.

Then it discusses the "elephant in the room". Those strategies might be really good ideas but the best idea (which doesn't seem to get much consideration from Danone,) is to phase out factory farming. The author then goes on to describe all that is wrong with factory farming.

The conclusion is that this is a good start but there is much more to be done.
 
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So Danone is setting some goals and maybe going to take some measures to reduce the GHG methane.

I haven't read or even heard of Grist before. I thought this was a great piece of reporting.
First it details some of the strategies that might be used to reduce methane production, reducing methane production in cows, capturing the methane, and manure management.

Then it discusses the "elephant in the room". Those strategies might be really good ideas but the best idea (which doesn't seem to get much consideration from Danone,) is to phase out factory farming. The author then goes on to describe all that is wrong with factory farming.

The conclusion is that this is a good start but there is much more to be do

The dairy industry is really scared. They know consumers are waking up to the horrors of their industry,
and the fact that their products are not great from the human body. But, consumers are sadly believing that
cheese is okay while milk, is not, Dean foods and Borden thankfully, are gone...much less carnage from unhappy enslaved cows.
They should have done what Elmhurst dairy did YEARS ago, stop cow milk and make only plant milks.
 
more news from the dairy front.

This is a well written and researched article about what is happening in the dairy industry right now.
Some interesting stuff and Points of view.

 
The article below is a response to the article above.




BTW, The Take Out is a publication that reports and supports the food industry.

The author of the article is much more positive about milk than the NYT's article which was informative, balanced and fair.

However the author of The Take Out article doesn't quite seem to get it. Although his personal anecdotes and preferences are very not pro-milk.

Humans don't need milk, the USA does not need the milk industry. It's time and past time to move on.
I think the milk industry is fighting a losing battle.
 
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Every now and then on the Internet, people discover something about food that you thought everyone already knew. Hey, we're all learning, right?​
"Today years old when I found out Parmesan cheese is made from baby cow’s stomach & I could go cry," one user wrote on Twitter, prompting others to learn this too. "I’m just gonna have to go full vegan at this point."​



 
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