The chicory thread.

Daxx

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I'm not talking about the dried up coffee substitute—that is nice, but the fresh endive. Chicory seems to have a slightly revered status as something for the connoisseur and I can't understand why. Over the years I've been served it, tried cooking it, and every time found it so bitter to be barely edible. However, a forum search search shows that it's a not unpopular ingredient on people's plates here! I can't understand why you'd choose it, when there are so many veggies out there that are actually nice. What am I missing?

So, chicory is horrible—prove me wrong! :–)
 
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silva

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I'm not talking about the dried up coffee substitute—that is nice, but the fresh endive. Chicory seems to have a slightly revered status as something for the connoisseur and I can't understand why. Over the years I've been served it, tried cooking it, and every time found it so bitter to be barely edible. However, a forum search search shows that it's a not unpopular ingredient on people's plates here! I can't understand why you'd choose it, when there are so many veggies out there that are actually nice. What am I missing?

So, chicory is horrible—prove me wrong! :–)
Well, my grandparents would sometimes use the dried chickory coffee, and I hate that!
I got confused by your speaking of chickory and endive as if they're the same. I know chickory as the 'frisee' greens, and endive as the long thick stemmed leaves with yellowy---these---

I really dislike chickory in all it's uses, but endive is okay grilled. I can't remember the last time I had it though, I keep meaning to try it again. It's popular to have with white beans, which sounds nice
 

shyvas

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I'm a huge fan of chicory during the Winter months. :) I either make salads or also braised/caramelised chicory and also bakes. You should always buy tight leaved ones and the tips must be yellow not green. You can also remove the inside(the cone) at the base to remove any bitterness. However, I've never experienced eating a bitter chicory dish , at least when I've prepared it my-self.

Chicory is quite versatile and you can make so many different recipes with it. It is also low in calories and quite high in fibre.

A show stopper is chicory tart tatin which is very easy to make.
 
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Daxx

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I got confused by your speaking of chickory and endive as if they're the same.
chicory.jpg
Ah I didn't realise that curly stuff was also known as chickory. ^This^ is the stuff I'm on about. Endive, or commonly sold as chicory on UK supermarket shelves.

I never used to think I was sensitive to bitter flavours, but you and shyvas seem fine with it so I'm starting to wonder. It wasn't only the core root that I found challenging, more the entire thing.
 

silva

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I'm going to take back my being ok with it, I know I had it before long ago, but really don't remember it, Now I need to get some!
 

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View attachment 24646
Ah I didn't realise that curly stuff was also known as chickory. ^This^ is the stuff I'm on about. Endive, or commonly sold as chicory on UK supermarket shelves.

I never used to think I was sensitive to bitter flavours, but you and shyvas seem fine with it so I'm starting to wonder. It wasn't only the core root that I found challenging, more the entire thing.

Yes.
 

KLS52

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Interesting...I can’t comment on it because I don’t think I’ve ever had it. I know that sometimes I would have a salad with mixed greens and there would be something in there that I found to be bitter but I can’t say if it was chicory /endive. Now I’m curious and might pick some up but I need to Google first to see what I want to do with it.
 

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I have to go walking so I’m ready for my Target Tuesday adventure...I will read this when I get back.

1622544475555.png

It says that in the US you call it Dutch Witlof or Belgian endive. In the UK it's called chicory.
 
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KLS52

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I’ve seen the frisée in salad...I wonder if that’s what I don’t like. My mom used to make escarole a lot with beans. I love that. I never make a lot of dishes with greens that need to be washed well. I remember her filling the sink with water and always having something soaking in there lol. I’m too lazy for that. I don’t mind a quick rinse but some of the greens she made were really dirty//gritty. I’m sure she “foraged” for a lot of them...especially dandelions. I can remember driving somewhere and suddenly stopping at the side of the road to pick dandelion greens. The “good old days”. I miss them sometimes.
 
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shyvas

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I’ve seen the frisée in salad...I wonder if that’s what I don’t like. My mom used to make escarole a lot with beans. I love that. I never make a lot of dishes with greens that need to be washed well. I remember her filling the sink with water and always having something soaking in there lol. I’m too lazy for that. I don’t mind a quick rinse but some of the greens she made were really dirty//gritty. I’m sure she “foraged” for a lot of them...especially dandelions. I can remember driving somewhere and suddenly stopping at the side of the road to pick dandelion greens. The “good old days”. I miss them sometimes.

1622551405171.png

It's called frisee endive or curly endive. I like it with a Dijon vinaigrette and warm smokey faux bacon bits.

We also used to go and pick wild field mushrooms, sorrel and brambles when I was a tot. We also had wild orchards nearby so apples, plums and cobnuts are plentiful and free.
I also miss the good old days.....
 
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I've never had the pointy oblong type lettuce/endive/chickory, either cold or cooked. KLS52, arugula is more common and bitter, noticeably bitter. We planted some again, my hubs and I can almost stand it but not very well, it is bitey.
I use the dried roasted chickory root, in a coffee substitute I make with roasted barley and rye, and roasted jerusalem artichokes, blended at about 1/3 each. It makes a wonderful hot drink, especially in cold weather. Adding just a little cocoa, and sweetener, it's like a hot full bodied coffee mocha.
 
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silva

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I can't stand how frisee feels in my mouth--like eating plant hair. :yuck:
Arugula is a wide range of bitter, from mild baby, to really strong that I dislike!
I just bought an organic blend of baby spinach and argula by mistake- hope it's mild!
 

shyvas

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I'm not talking about the dried up coffee substitute—that is nice, but the fresh endive. Chicory seems to have a slightly revered status as something for the connoisseur and I can't understand why. Over the years I've been served it, tried cooking it, and every time found it so bitter to be barely edible. However, a forum search search shows that it's a not unpopular ingredient on people's plates here! I can't understand why you'd choose it, when there are so many veggies out there that are actually nice. What am I missing?

So, chicory is horrible—prove me wrong! :–)

I've mentioned braised chicory in several Supper/Dinner threads: :D

 

shyvas

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A few tips to counteract the slight bitterness of certain vegetables:


I find that only dandelion leaves are bitter (which I like) and really enjoy salad leaves such as rocket especially when served with a tasty vinaigrette and slightly sweet vegetables such as sweet potatoes.
 
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Daxx

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I can't stand how frisee feels in my mouth--like eating plant hair. :yuck:
Arugula is a wide range of bitter, from mild baby, to really strong that I dislike!
I just bought an organic blend of baby spinach and argula by mistake- hope it's mild!

You're mad! Arugula (Rocket) is delicious :p I can understand people not liking it for the pepperiness, but I wouldn't have described it as very bitter.
 

Daxx

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A few tips to counteract the slight bitterness of certain vegetables:

Cheers. Yes I mostly do those already; I like a nice vinegary dressing with raw garlic in it most of all.

Even the smallest amount of Chicory/Endive tastes so bad to me, that these techniques haven't really masked it. It was over a decade ago now, but I was served it in a rich sauce like it was a special treat, and still no amount of double cream could hide the taste. I think this may be one of those things where certain people's taste buds are just wired a certain way.

I find that only dandelion leaves are bitter (which I like) and really enjoy salad leaves such as rocket especially when served with a tasty vinaigrette and slightly sweet vegetables such as sweet potatoes.

I did a bit of foraging last year and quite enjoyed dandelion, in small quantities. I wouldn't recommend Cleaver, it's not horrible, just a bit pointless. I certainly won't be trying Primrose again—that had quite a purgative effect on me...
 
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shyvas

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Even the smallest amount of Chicory/Endive tastes so bad to me, that these techniques haven't really masked it. It was over a decade ago now, but I was served it in a rich sauce like it was a special treat, and still no amount of double cream could hide the taste. I think this may be one of those things where certain people's taste buds are just wired a certain way.

I can't comment on the chicory that you tasted and yes everyone's taste buds are different. Some people feel overpowered by certain ingredients and others don't. I really dislike raw onion and garlic and lots of people rave about them.......:confused:

Have you tried removing the the centre of the stalk in a cone shape? Have you tried caramelising the chicory?
 

silva

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You're mad! Arugula (Rocket) is delicious :p I can understand people not liking it for the pepperiness, but I wouldn't have described it as very bitter.
I'm mixing it up. the baby argula in the spinach mix has round edges, I'm thinking of one with very spiky edges, ,maybe frisee?
Anyways, the baby argula is very tasty, and has a good texture