V3G4N

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Hello, I am new to vegan dieting as a whole, and I would like to make it sustainable long term (health-wise, cost-wise, etc.).
Is there any place I could ask for suggestions ?
Keep in mind I am completely new, though I have read on some information, it is all very overwhelming (there may also be misinformation).
I did find a few websites like vegfaqs (which lead me to Cronometer, which seems like it will be a very useful tool), vegansociety, openfoodfacts and food-nutrients-calculator, but it still all seems very overwhelming, and balancing it all seems tricky.
Is there any place I could ask for constant tips from more experienced people ?
I am asking because I don't mean to be annoying, and I'll probably need a lot of help (balancing, finding the right proportions of Protein/Fat/Carbs/Minerals/Vitamins, etc.) and/or ask a lot of questions, so it will probably be a multi-day/long time thing.
Again, I apologise if this isn't the right/best place to post this, just wanted to see if there's anywhere I can do this sort of thing.
I wish you whoever is reading this a great day !
 

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Thanks for the wishes for a great day, and a great day it IS.

This forum is a good place. Cronometer is great, I don't use it every day, more like about once a month, just to check out vitamins or minerals or fat content.
Facebook has Groups. There are dozens of support groups for all varieties of whole food plant based, or vegan, or by any doctor like McDougall, or Greger, and recipe sites just for wfpb and vegan and no oil no sugar no salt recipes.

There's so much to learn, so join a bunch of groups, see what helps you best, then keep those for support! You can do it.
 

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Hello, I am new to vegan dieting as a whole, and I would like to make it sustainable long term (health-wise, cost-wise, etc.).
Is there any place I could ask for suggestions ?
Keep in mind I am completely new, though I have read on some information, it is all very overwhelming (there may also be misinformation).
I did find a few websites like vegfaqs (which lead me to Cronometer, which seems like it will be a very useful tool), vegansociety, openfoodfacts and food-nutrients-calculator, but it still all seems very overwhelming, and balancing it all seems tricky.
Is there any place I could ask for constant tips from more experienced people ?
I am asking because I don't mean to be annoying, and I'll probably need a lot of help (balancing, finding the right proportions of Protein/Fat/Carbs/Minerals/Vitamins, etc.) and/or ask a lot of questions, so it will probably be a multi-day/long time thing.
Again, I apologise if this isn't the right/best place to post this, just wanted to see if there's anywhere I can do this sort of thing.
I wish you whoever is reading this a great day !
.
Hi V3G4N,

The Vegan Society has a nicely-designed vegan nutrition guide. It explains the basics without getting too complicated: Nutrition overview

If you are worried about getting enough of the various vitamins, you can buy vegan daily multivitamins from Amazon. Here is one kind, but there are many others: DEVA Vegan Multivitamin & Mineral Supplement Tablets, 90 Tablets: Amazon.co.uk: Business, Industry & Science
 
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welcome to the forum

everyone here is always happy to help and to answer specific questions - generalizing means we would all have to put our life stories out there because no one gets it exactly right, right away - it is a journey

I, personally, find it very helpful watching vegan youtubers - people like Simnett Nutrition, High Carb Hannah, Cheap Lazy Vegan, Dr Greger's nutrition facts .org videos, Dr MacDougall's videos - there are tons and tons out there.

I love reading here what other people are eating and how they are living. It keeps me focused and by posting what I am eating it keeps me accountable too.

I wish you all the best in this journey, which is not a diet, but a lifestyle that is good for your health, yes, but also very good for the environment and most of all for the animals.

Emma JC
Find your vegan soulmate or just a friend. www.spiritualmatchmaking.com
 

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We also have whole threads dedicated to YouTube videos. And there is a thread on our favorite WFPB doctors.

I'm more of a book - learner. If I had to recommend just One book it would be Eat To Live.
Although if anyone thought it should be How Not To Die, I wouldn't argue with them. :)


 

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We also have whole threads dedicated to YouTube videos. And there is a thread on our favorite WFPB doctors.

I'm more of a book - learner. If I had to recommend just One book it would be Eat To Live.
Although if anyone thought it should be How Not To Die, I wouldn't argue with them. :)


Won't argue with you either! But...
Not only is Julieanna Hever a Registared Dietician but she delves into so many different real life concerns about transitioning
 

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Brenda Davis is also good, her books, one is Becoming Vegan, a well rounded view with lots of science and medical studies to back it up. My favorite video of hers is The Whole Grain Hierarchy. If you struggle to understand how whole foods benefit you in ways that processing the foods changes it, this one will clear up questions on grains.

I'm through chapter 12 of Whole by Colin Campbell, and that one clears up the reasons why there is so much emphasis in the medical profession on pills and procedures, supplements, while brushing by the nutritional aspects of whole food plant based lifestyle which are more beneficial than any pills/procedures/supplements.
 
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Long time no see, I hope you all have been all right since last time we talked !
I apologise for not talking for a while, my focus has been on trying to finish some key exams.

I think I haven't mentioned earlier that there are a few key details, which I should probably mention so I don't accidentally affect anything later:

- I still live with my parents and I don't want to cost them too much (time and/or money) or be too much of a burden, or worry them that I don't get enough nutrients...speaking of:

A few health problems which were discovered upon doing a blood test:
- liver inflammation (Medic's advice: for the most part, eat foods which aren't hard on the liver: no fried stuff (oils), seeds/nuts in excess)
- lack of iron in blood (been trying to eat spinach + broccoli, but I don't know if the oxalate from this does more harm than good, or if there is a better way; see next issue)
- urine test with higher densities (Medic's advice: gotta drink lots of liquids to avoid kidney stones)
- some thyroid irregularities (Medic's advice: make sure I eat enough and get enough nutrients).

I don't know for sure, but in theory, a vegan diet could be healthier but there is the worry on how this change of diet affects me, so me having a normal diet would probably worry my close ones less.
I already have a few supplements (with B12, too) but I am unsure how it fits in with what I eat (not only under-, but also overdoing nutrients could do more harm than good, so it may be a bit of a balancing act; then again, supplements' cost is also a thing); I also think of making what I eat mostly protein (maybe I should do more sports, too).
EDIT: have more protein;
Maybe also reducing sugar/salt/fats in general would help ?

Overall, what advice do you have on my current dillema ?
 
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Oh, I am sorry...
I meant "more" protein, not mostly; I found an article mentioning something called "body recomposition", anyone know more about that ?
Also, I heard there are more types of vegan; What types are there ? Are there some types healthier than others ? Which one is the healthiest ? (Though again, sustainability is a thing too...)
 
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- I still live with my parents and I don't want to cost them too much (time and/or money) or be too much of a burden, or worry them that I don't get enough nutrients...speaking of:

Shouldn't be a problem. As far as I can tell there are very few expensive "Vegan Foods" that are must haves. If eating more fresh fruits and vegetables is a goal - and if those are expensive in your area - Yeah, that could be a little expensive. And there are ways to mitigate that too. buying locally, in season helps. canned and frozen too.

Milk is a "must have" in my book. and plant milks are more expensive. but there are work arounds there too.

A few health problems which were discovered upon doing a blood test:
- liver inflammation (Medic's advice: for the most part, eat foods which aren't hard on the liver: no fried stuff (oils), seeds/nuts in excess)
- lack of iron in blood (been trying to eat spinach + broccoli, but I don't know if the oxalate from this does more harm than good, or if there is a better way; see next issue)
- urine test with higher densities (Medic's advice: gotta drink lots of liquids to avoid kidney stones)
- some thyroid irregularities (Medic's advice: make sure I eat enough and get enough nutrients).
WFPB vegans avoid oils anyway. and moderate seeds and nuts, too.

I have never really concerned myself with oxalates. I'm pretty sure I go a lot every day. but there are some things you can do to mitigate the effects of oxalates.

  • Drinking plenty of water to help your body flush oxalates out
  • Consuming enough calcium, which binds to oxalates during digestion
  • Limiting sodium and sugar intake, which may contribute to kidney stones at high levels
  • Getting the recommended amounts of vitamin C — too much can increase oxalic acid production in your body
  • Cooking some vegetables can lower their oxalate content
I don't know for sure, but in theory, a vegan diet could be healthier but there is the worry on how this change of diet affects me, so me having a normal diet would probably worry my close ones less.
I already have a few supplements (with B12, too) but I am unsure how it fits in with what I eat (not only under-, but also overdoing nutrients could do more harm than good, so it may be a bit of a balancing act; then again, supplements' cost is also a thing); I also think of making what I eat mostly protein (maybe I should do more sports, too).
EDIT: have more protein;
Maybe also reducing sugar/salt/fats in general would help ?

Overall, what advice do you have on my current dillema ?
If you get your nutrients from Whole Foods there is little or no chance of "more harm than good".

If you use supplements there are some vitamins and minerals you have to watch out for. Vitamin A, Iron and Calcium are the ones that come to mind first. A lot of multis don't include any iron. or pick out one that has just a little. Most multis contains just a little calcium.
 

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Oh, I am sorry...
I meant "more" protein, not mostly; I found an article mentioning something called "body recomposition", anyone know more about that ?
Also, I heard there are more types of vegan; What types are there ? Are there some types healthier than others ? Which one is the healthiest ? (Though again, sustainability is a thing too...)


I think (and I think everyone who answered your first post would agree), that your best bet is becoming a Whole Foods Plant-Based (WFPB) Vegan. there are a few flavors of those but they are mostly the same thing.
If you want to pick out a book, I still recommend Gregar or Furhman. But Davis, Herver, McDougal are all just fine, too.
 
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Shouldn't be a problem. As far as I can tell there are very few expensive "Vegan Foods" that are must haves. If eating more fresh fruits and vegetables is a goal - and if those are expensive in your area - Yeah, that could be a little expensive. And there are ways to mitigate that too. buying locally, in season helps. canned and frozen too.
There are options; a shopping district is at a somewhat reasonable distance away, just saying I can't do anything too pricey.
There is also a market which is closer, so that could be an option too.
Milk is a "must have" in my book. and plant milks are more expensive. but there are work arounds there too.
As for plant milks, these are indeed pricy, however is an option at a shop for soy milk which is cheaper (which I have been using); same for tofu.
Also, what kind of cereal should I buy, or what criteria should I apply to choose ?
I have been buying musli that has mostly oatmeal, plus some cornflakes and dry fruit (bits) in it.
WFPB vegans avoid oils anyway. and moderate seeds and nuts, too.
That sounds alright, it says as unprocessed as possible; are seeds, oils and nuts a must in a vegan diet ?
Maybe also lowering salt, sugar and fats in general would help.
Also, what would be the best/healthiest macro [Protein, Carbs (Fiber, Starch), Fat ?] ratio (or does it depend on goal) ?
I have never really concerned myself with oxalates. I'm pretty sure I go a lot every day. but there are some things you can do to mitigate the effects of oxalates.
  • Drinking plenty of water to help your body flush oxalates out
  • Consuming enough calcium, which binds to oxalates during digestion
  • Limiting sodium and sugar intake, which may contribute to kidney stones at high levels
  • Getting the recommended amounts of vitamin C — too much can increase oxalic acid production in your body
  • Cooking some vegetables can lower their oxalate content
Trying to drink more water, as per medic's advice, too.
For calcium, I read that collard greens are a good source, and spinach too.
For sodium, what should I look out for ?
Also for sugar, what should I look out for in general ?
Are fruit okay ?
I heard white stuff (rice, bread, sugar) is bad for this.
For vitamin C, I recall the supplement having 225% the required dose, so perhaps I should be careful with that (not to mention I may already get enough from spinach)
I've been eating a lot of tofu; for spinach & broccoli, I have been boiling it.
If you get your nutrients from Whole Foods there is little or no chance of "more harm than good".
I read there is also "raw veganism", with uncooked food, which is healthier and can give more energy. What are your thoughts on that and how accessible would it be ?
Also, my weight tends to vary a lot and I tend to have a lot of gas. Any advice/thoughts on this, too ?
If you use supplements there are some vitamins and minerals you have to watch out for. Vitamin A, Iron and Calcium are the ones that come to mind first. A lot of multis don't include any iron. or pick out one that has just a little. Most multis contains just a little calcium.
Perhaps it would be better if I just post what supplements I have.
EDIT: Supradyn, Energy, Coenzyme Q10 and Vigantoletten D3 1000UI;
In general, if I were to analyze, I would probably have trouble getting Omega-3 fats (I don't know if I ever had any supplement for them).
B12 was in all the supplements so far, and for Vitamin D a medic gave me a supplement (had a deficiency a while ago on some older tests);
There might be others I lack like Iodine (?), Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Selenium, etc. but I am unsure as to which I might lack, exactly, nor as to what supplements I should buy (If they are vegan or not, plus costs, transport included)
 
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There are options; a shopping district is at a somewhat reasonable distance away, just saying I can't do anything too pricey.
There is also a market which is closer, so that could be an option too.

How available (and expensive) are fresh fruit and veggies?
A lot of food you are going to eat are normal things that your parents can continue to buy for you
As for plant milks, these are indeed pricy, however is an option at a shop for soy milk which is cheaper (which I have been using); same for tofu.

Soy milk and tofu are not "must Haves". but If you can get them it makes a vegan diet much easier.
Also, what kind of cereal should I buy, or what criteria should I apply to choose ?

Oatmeal. You don't have to be vegan to eat oatmeal. but most of the vegans I know do. Its also much cheaper and more healthy than other options. A lot of us VFers eat oatmeal almost everyday. We even have a thread that is just about oatmeal.
I have been buying musli that has mostly oatmeal, plus some cornflakes and dry fruit (bits) in it.
That sounds good too.
That sounds alright, it says as unprocessed as possible; are seeds, oils and nuts a must in a vegan diet ?

I still use small amounts of oil in my cooking but a good WFPB diet may go entirely oil -free.
Although nuts and seeds are part of a good diet, they are consumed in moderation. Maybe 2 tbsp of seeds and about the same as nuts.
Maybe also lowering salt, sugar and fats in general would help.
That is exactly what a WFPB diet does.
Also, what would be the best/healthiest macro [Protein, Carbs (Fiber, Starch), Fat ?] ratio (or does it depend on goal) ?

That is an excellent question. I don't think there is a clear answer.
One thing that is for sure is that your protein goal should be over 10%.
I think most of the community uses a number between 20 and 30%

Fats should be less than 30%. Some people can get as low as 20% but I find that almost impossible to do.

Despite what the mainstream press says - Carbs are good. 40 - 60% are good goals.
using a C/P/F format. I hear that 60/20/20 is really good for most vegans. Athletic vegans might go with a a 50/25/25.


Trying to drink more water, as per medic's advice, too.
That is excellent advice. One good trick is to find a water bottle that has a straw or a spout built in and just sip on it all day long. I found one that holds 24 ounces. I fill it up and finish it before dinner. The remainder I get thru drinking other beverages. Mixing some fruit juice or adding a lemon to your water is good, too.

Some people just chug 8 oz at certain times of a day. Like when they get up, right after breakfast, right after lunch, right after dinner, and before bed.
For calcium, I read that collard greens are a good source, and spinach too.
yes. Here is a good list
And remember that tofu and soy milk have plenty of calcium.
For sodium, what should I look out for ?
I think the main source of sodium is other people's cooking. If you don't add much salt to your food you tend to be ok. Prepared meals you buy in the store tend to be super salty.
Also for sugar, what should I look out for in general ?
Again, it is mostly other people's cooking. When minimizing sugar keep in mind that the think you are minimizing is added sugar. you can add raisins or other dried fruit to your oatmeal. but real fruit is best. A handful of berries is what I recommend.
Are fruit okay ?

For the most part. But moderation is usually a good idea. especially if you are trying to lose weight. Minimize dried fruit and fruit juices - but you probably don't have to totally avoid them. Two pieces of fruit per day is a good minimum goal.
I heard white stuff (rice, bread, sugar) is bad for this.
This is where we get into Whole Foods vs processed foods. When we talk about processed foods we are talking about foods that have had something removed, like fiber, or ones that have had something added, like sugar, salt and or oil.

Brown rice is less processed than white rice. Whole wheat is less processed than white bread.
For vitamin C, I recall the supplement having 225% the required dose, so perhaps I should be careful with that (not to mention I may already get enough from spinach)

You can't over do the C. its water soluble and you just pee it out. I find vitamin C supplements unnecessary . you get plenty if you are eating fruits and veggies. however C does help with iron absorption.
I've been eating a lot of tofu; for spinach & broccoli, I have been boiling it.

Tofu is great. There is some risk of over doing soy protein. I think I remember that you should keep your soy intake below 25 grams of soy protein a day. that would be less than 2 servings of tofu a day. or less than 3 -4 glasses of soy milk a day.

If you boil your veggies some of the vitamins just end up in the water. I guess there are ways to salvage the vitamins - like saving the water for broth. But most of us just use a steamer. you can probably find a metal steamer at a garage sale or thrift store. All my pots are non stick so I had to go out and buy a nylon steamer.

Steamed veggies are not only more nutritious - they are even tastier.
I read there is also "raw veganism", with uncooked food, which is healthier and can give more energy. What are your thoughts on that and how accessible would it be ?
I think raw is a fad diet. Although some food lose some nutrition when cooked. in some foods, cooking makes the nutrients more available. Plus its expensive. And... to get a minimum amount of protein without beans takes a huge amount of calorie intake. A raw diet is only something like 10% protein. Those raw vegans on YouTube eat huge numbers of calories a day. And then they are all athletes and exercise it off. Kristina is a yoga instructor. Freebie would bike like 25 miles to work and then instruct fitness classes.

a combination of cooked and raw is best. one popular diet is Raw till 4 (RT4). so dinner is cooked. Dr. Fuhrman is a big advocate of a Big Salad once a day.
Also, my weight tends to vary a lot and I tend to have a lot of gas. Any advice/thoughts on this, too ?
Gas seems to be a common complaint among new vegans. I think the gut has to get used to the increase in fiber. If you are eating black beans - rinse and soak them.
Try weighing yourself at the same time every day. and write it down.
But yeah, some daily fluctuations are inevitable.
Perhaps it would be better if I just post what supplements I have.
EDIT: Supradyn, Energy, Coenzyme Q10 and Vigantoletten D3 1000UI;
I don't know anything about Q10. But D is good idea especially if you live in the northern latitudes or its winter.
In general, if I were to analyze, I would probably have trouble getting Omega-3 fats (I don't know if I ever had any supplement for them).
I think vegans Have to supplement Omega 3. and with the different types it becomes complicated fast. We have some threads on it. I try to rely on ground flaxseed which I add to my oatmeal or flaxseed oil for my ALA. and I take a EPA/DHA supplement too.
B12 was in all the supplements so far, and for Vitamin D a medic gave me a supplement (had a deficiency a while ago on some older tests);
My soy mik is fortified and my tofu too. so I get most of the B12 and D I need from those. but those are good things to supplement too.
There might be others I lack like Iodine (?), Calcium, Iron, Zinc, Selenium, etc. but I am unsure as to which I might lack, exactly, nor as to what supplements I should buy (If they are vegan or not, plus costs, transport included)

Hey have you tried out Cronometer yet. Use CronOmeter for a week and look at the summary - the vitamins and mineral you need to supplement should jump out at you. Besides the omega 3, I found I need a multi and a Magnesium. I have no problems with calcium or iron. but do have issues with some others including Zinc and iodine - the multi takes care of both those. But everyone is different so using Cronometer eliminates most of the guess work.

Cronometer just evaluates what your eat. but absorption is different. A regular check up should reveal any issues before they become a problem.
 
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Good day to you all once more !
If I might ask, what seeds (or little things that I probably wouldn't give much importance to in general) would be beneficial to add to my diet ?
I was also thinking of adding a mix of seeds to my cereals; unsure as to which ones and in what quantities, though. Thoughts ?
For CronOmeter, although there are Omega 3 fats displayed on the daily requirements, but I heard there are more types of these (ALA, DHA, EPA ?) and I am unsure if I get all the required types; thoughts ? (Also, are there any more types of nutrient like this which could be easy to miss ?)
Does anyone have a chart of the best protein sources ?
Also wanted to ask, what are the best supplements ? (trying to get more options to check the ones most adequate in content, price, etc.)
What should I go for if I have the option, fruit, cereal, or legumes (hierarchically) ? (My macro is set to P25/C55/F20; recipes could maybe help a lot, too; be they online or in books; Also, are there any vegan "super-foods" with a lot of nutrients ?)
 
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Good day to you all once more !
If I might ask, what seeds (or little things that I probably wouldn't give much importance to in general) would be beneficial to add to my diet ?
I was also thinking of adding a mix of seeds to my cereals; unsure as to which ones and in what quantities, though. Thoughts ?
Dr. Greger, the guy who wrote the book, How Not To Die, has a thing called The Daily Dozen. If you haven't seen it already, I'll post a link to a pdf of it. Its a checklist of all the foods and quantities you need to eat a day.

He includes seeds and nuts as two food groups you should eat everyday, but in moderation. 1 tbsp of seeds and two tbsp of nuts.

Dr. Fuhrman, the guy who wrote the book, Eat to Live, is a big proponent of what he calls The Big Salad*. When I make my big salad I include 2 tbsp of sunflower seeds and 2 tbsp of slivered almonds, thereby meeting my seeds and nuts requirement all in one meal.

The theory is that we must eat a balance of Omega 3s to Omega 6s. The typical Carnist diet includes way too many Omega 6s. and vegans may have issues with getting enough Omega 3s. There are some seeds that are especially good sources of Omega 3. My favorites are Hemp, Chia, and Flax.

Hemp seeds need to have their hulls removed. When you buy them in a store with the hulls removed they are called Hemp Hearts (recipe ideas below) . Flax seeds need to be ground. you can buy them ground or just use a coffee grinder. Chia sees don't have to be ground but you can if you want to. Hemp hearts, and ground chia and flax seeds should be stored in the refrigerator.

When I make oatmeal I add one to two tbsp of ground flax seeds. Dr Gregar also recommends berries daily. I'll add some raisins or strawberries or blueberries to my oatmeal too. then I can check off several foods right off the bat. Chia seeds are good in things like Overnight Oats.


For CronOmeter, although there are Omega 3 fats displayed on the daily requirements, but I heard there are more types of these (ALA, DHA, EPA ?) and I am unsure if I get all the required types; thoughts ? (Also, are there any more types of nutrient like this which could be easy to miss ?)

ALA is what you find in the seeds I mentioned.
The good news is that the body can convert ALA to DHA and EPA. So DHA and EPA are not labeled as essential. There are even some more versions of Omega 3s but they don't get much attention.
The bad news is that this conversion process is slow and there are researchers that think its too slow to meet our daily requirements. Plus its supposed to slow down as you get older. So for older vegans it might be necessary to supplement DHA and EPA. Dr. Gregar has written quite a lot on it. I think its in one of our Omega 3 threads... I'll look for it later.


Does anyone have a chart of the best protein sources ?

There are quite a few of these. Google "vegan protein sources" and you will get like a million hits. :)
One of my pet peeves is that a lot of these guys are hung up on complete proteins. which should not be getting a lot of attention. The other thing that does not get enough attention is that almost all plants are protein sources. Sure some are better than others but even lettuce is a source of protein.

If I was assigned to teach Vegan 101, this would be required reading.
but to answer your question. here is good list.

Or another way to answer that question is Beans, beans, beans, seeds, nuts, greens, vegetables, grains.
Also wanted to ask, what are the best supplements ? (trying to get more options to check the ones most adequate in content, price, etc.)
I'm a fan of a company called DEVA. I do admit that I have a overly strong leaning to brand loyalty. But there are lots of good companies. You might want to compare DEVA to Hippo 7.

What should I go for if I have the option, fruit, cereal, or legumes (hierarchically) ?
That is a good question. But its not the Right question. Like asking what is more important: Sleeping or eating.

So to answer your question round-aboutly, please check out the Daily Dozen
(My macro is set to P25/C55/F20; recipes could maybe help a lot, too; be they online or in books; Also, are there any vegan "super-foods" with a lot of nutrients ?)

When I hear the word superfood I immediately think, "Hoax!" or " Hype!".
if there is a vegan superfood, I think it is the lowly soybean.
anyway, here is one good list

------------------

There is also an app for the daily dozen. but I have printed out this PDF and laminated it and put it on the refrigerator with a dry erase pen. That way I can check off things as I go. (I love checking things off lists)


* Actually I am not sure if Dr. Fuhrman calls it a big salad. that may just be my name for it.

Further reading
 
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feather

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V3G4N, really, you gotta start somewhere, get a book, use cronometer, don't worry about supplements for at least a month (your liver stores B12 for a long time), start getting the right foods, maybe visit the library and get a cookbook if you like. Google as questions come up, and if you can't find information, you've got lots of people to ask. You don't want to wear out the helpful advice givers. (LOU I'M talking about you, you saintly patient lover of knowledge.)

I think the percentage of calories from protein at 25% is too high. If I over indulge I might get to 13%. You don't need more protein than 40-50 grams, any extra has to be passed through the kidneys and that puts wear and tear on them, which is why kidney disease is on the rise, so please don't push your protein too high.

Due to wanting to lose weight (before), I was aiming for 10% calories from fat, and I probably get around 15-18% now (not concerned with blood pressure or being over weight anymore).
So then 10/10/80, in the beginning and I get about 50-65 grams of fiber per day. That has gotten me very healthy! Now I'm lax with 17/10/73. I don't have joint pain, sleep like a baby, don't get sick often (really one sore throat in 2.5 years), my eye sight is better, my hair grew so fast it was past my waist until I cut it just to get it out of my way (and that hadn't happened in the previous 60 years). I'm 61.
 
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Lou

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V3G4N, really, you gotta start somewhere, get a book, use cronometer, don't worry about supplements for at least a month (your liver stores B12 for a long time), start getting the right foods, maybe visit the library and get a cookbook if you like. Google as questions come up, and if you can't find information, you've got lots of people to ask. You don't want to wear out the helpful advice givers. (LOU I'M talking about you, you saintly patient lover of knowledge.)

I think the percentage of calories from protein at 25% is too high. If I over indulge I might get to 13%. You don't need more protein than 40-50 grams, any extra has to be passed through the kidneys and that puts wear and tear on them, which is why kidney disease is on the rise, so please don't push your protein too high.

Due to wanting to lose weight (before), I was aiming for 10% calories from fat, and I probably get around 15-18% now (not concerned with blood pressure or being over weight anymore).
So then 10/10/80, in the beginning and I get about 50-65 grams of fiber per day. That has gotten me very healthy! Now I'm lax with 17/10/73. I don't have joint pain, sleep like a baby, don't get sick often (really one sore throat in 2.5 years), my eye sight is better, my hair grew so fast it was past my waist until I cut it just to get it out of my way (and that hadn't happened in the previous 60 years). I'm 61.
Good stuff. and I think getting different advice from different people is important.
but he doesn't have to worry about wearing me out. I live for helping people out. I wish I had a good source of information back when I got started.

I try to keep in mind that nutrition is not an exact science and there seem to be a lot of room for interpretation. Maybe the most common recommendation for vegans is 20/20/60. Forty grams of protein is the bare minimum to sustain life. When kidney patients go on a low protein diet - that is their target. And of course it is dependent on age, sex, and activity levels. as people age they need more protein because of absorption issues. active people need more protein too - to repair muscle damage.

I have tried to get my fat percentage down below 20%. I can't even keep them below 25%. I get tired of seeing red bars in Cronometer so I just made my target 25%. (love those green bars) I do have my protein target set at 20%. And I could see knocking it down a few percentage points. I probably could be persuaded to do down to 15%.

anyway congrats on keeping your fat intake so low. I do drink a lot of soy milk and eat a lot of tofu - those two things supply with me most of my fat.

As far as kidney damage goes. the current research is that with each meal you can absorb at least 20 grams of protein. its the excess protein that does the damage. So for most of us we should be able to eat 60 grams a day.

But yeah, I don't know everything about this subject. A lot of what I know about this is from Dr. Barry Sears who "experimented" on the Stanford Swim Team which is far from your typical human being. but he found the best results to be 30/30/40. So his results do influence my thinking - but I try to keep in mind that I am not an 20 year old athlete. :)

and since I like to add substantiate my opinions I found this

"Generally, the recommendation is to eat 45 to 60 percent of calories from carbs, 15 to 25 percent of calories from protein, and 20 to 30 percent of calories from fat."

Read More: Should I Be Counting Macros on My Plant-Based Diet? | Should I Be Counting Macros on My Plant-Based Diet?"
 
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