Low fat plant based and nuts/seeds

Bitki

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I have recently started eating a plant based whole food diet after some minor medical issues (high blood pressure and blood sugars starting to rise) made me look more closely at my diet. After watching Game Changers, Cowspiracy, Forks over knives it seems like plant based eating is the best option for me. I was always sensitive about the plight of animals so I'm enjoying not eating meat, I haven't really missed it to be honest. Seafood I do miss, but I figure I have to start somewhere.

I was getting some aches in my joints although I was still eating dairy, that was after a month of changing my diet. I have since decided to cut out all animal products and see how I go.

I was wondering how much avocado and nuts/seeds people eat. I find I put a tablespoon of mixed nuts on my oats each morning with some berries. In one of the documents Dr Esselstyn was talking about a low fat plant based diet to halt/reverse heart disease. So he mentions low fat eating which means no avocado or nuts/seeds.

I have read the importance of fats for the brain so I'm wondering what people think about this.
 
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Lou

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I haven't read Esselstyn. I have read Gregar and Fuhrman. And both of those guys recommend a daily dose of nuts and seeds. But I think even with some nuts and seeds you can have a pretty low-fat diet.

Just a tablespoon of seeds and a handful of nuts will meet most of your requirements for healthy fats. I put ground flaxseed on my morning oatmeal. and grab a handful of nuts in the afternoon. I do sometimes have a couple of ounces of guacamole with some multigrain chips as a snack. In the summer I eat more salads and include a couple of tablespoons of sunflower seeds and a couple of ounces of slivered almonds. and occasionally a couple of slices of avocado.
 
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TofuRobot

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I was wondering how much avocado and nuts/seeds people eat. I find I put a tablespoon of mixed nuts on my oats each morning with some berries. In one of the documents Dr Esselstyn was talking about a low fat plant based diet to halt/reverse heart disease. So he mentions low fat eating which means no avocado or nuts/seeds.

I have read the importance of fats for the brain so I'm wondering what people think about this.
I eat anywhere from 1/4 - 1 whole avocado every day, plus probably about 4 handfuls of nuts - mostly walnuts and almonds. I may also have a teaspoon of nut butter or a LaraBar, which has cashews in it. These are really my primary and only sources of fat, aside from the rare "fast" meal I don't make myself, so I don't skimp (I don't use or cook with oil at home). I also take a vegan Omega3 maybe every other day, just for good measure.

Edit: I am also 5'2" and weigh just under 100 lbs. I think the experts only recommend keeping the nuts and seeds low if you're trying to lose weight, but I could be wrong about this.
 

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Edit: I am also 5'2" and weigh just under 100 lbs. I think the experts only recommend keeping the nuts and seeds low if you're trying to lose weight, but I could be wrong about this.

More importantly, the nuts and seeds (and fatty fruits like avocado) are kept low (mind you, not absent, just low) for people trying to reverse serious illnesses such as Coronary Heart Disease, in addition to vegan and oil free. It's not just to lose weight for some people.
 
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TofuRobot

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More importantly, the nuts and seeds (and fatty fruits like avocado) are kept low (mind you, not absent, just low) for people trying to reverse serious illnesses such as Coronary Heart Disease, in addition to vegan and oil free. It's not just to lose weight for some people.
Yes. That is also a very important point.
 
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Bitki

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Thanks. I have stopped using oils. I think the amount of nuts/seeds I am eating is probably about right then. I will also read Gregar and Fuhrman as well.
 
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Bob Who

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Hello Bitki,

Have you used Cronometer to see what the fat content of you diet is? You may be surprised at what foods contain fats and the in what quantities. Whether or not you choose to include nuts, seeds, avocado in your diet will depend on variables that will pertain to you as an individual and your goals. Do you monitor your blood pressure or blood glucose levels at home? If you do I'd highly suggest you keep records, a food diary, blood pressure , glucose levels, exercise and your weight. At the end of the day, it really is ALL ABOUT YOU, your individual results. It's not 100%, but the odds greatly favor this lifestyle.

I eat a vegan diet mostly for health reasons. I do have cardiovascular disease. I do have advanced osteoarthritis. In my case, it's pretty much all due to lifestyle. I have been eating this way for the past 4 years, and I'm quite happy to do so.

I might suggest you also add Neal Barnard to your reading list.
 

Lou

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Have you used Cronometer to see what the fat content of you diet is? You may be surprised at what foods contain fats and the in what quantities.

Hey. that was what I was going to say. but i always say that and I didn't want to sound like a broken record. So thanks for reciting that line for me.

Not sure what the official cutoffs for a low-fat diet is but the most common recommendation from the mainstream medical world is something between 20 to 30% of your calories come from fat. And Cronometer has these little graphs that can show you that with a glance.

Tofu and soymilk is something like 30% fat. It is pretty easy to get plenty of fat in your diet.
 
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