Giving Vegan another try.

bratvada

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Well I have been omnivore since around 2012. Before that I was vegan on and off since 2005.
I am going to give vegan another try.

I was planning on having a health kick as my new year resolution. I was simply going to walk more. Instead I am going to go back to vegan.

I have ordered a blender, to make a lot of smoothies. I think in the past I got hungry, I was not eating enough. So that is one thing I need to change.

Since going omnivore my cholesterol level has gone up so will be looking to reduce that again.

I have read many books on being a vegan and animal rights and I know my fair share about the issues and goals. I do think I need to read up on vegan nutrition though. To understand what foods I can eat to keep me full - I don't mean chips and burgers.

I have put on weight as an omni too. will be looking to getting slimmer.

I am planning oaty smoothies for breakfast, veggie smoothies for lunch, and a rice/pasta based meal for dinner.

I have specced out a plant based grocery delivery for next week.

I have some meat in the freezer. Will need to eat some and chuck out others.

The last few years have not been a total waste. I have given up smoking - now vaping. I have also educated myself on spiritual matters, and am much more adjusted to matters such as death!

I am also a schizophrenic, and have been trying to get better. But it is taking time. I am not working, and would like a low stress profession, just to cover my living costs.

That's all.
 
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winter.frost

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Welcome back to the vegan community!

My advice: eat a lot of fruit and raw food - as much as you can. I have also experienced mental illness, the details of which I won't go into, but I did notice my mood stabilise when I ate more fruit. I do realise that schizophrenia isn't so much about 'mood', though. Moreover I am aware that people suffering schizophrenia tend to suffer worse than others if they are folic acid or B12 deficient (in terms of their symptoms worsening, you can read about it here though I am sure you're already aware) so it is very important that you supplement B12 or eat enriched foods. For instance the vegan butters and milks that I use are fortified with folic acid and B12; so long as I use these I don't go out of my way to buy vitamin pills. If you're unsure, you can always get a blood test once you're further into your vegan diet.

You may also find this 30bananasaday thread interesting.

Wishing you the very best of luck in your new resolutions.

:)
 
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bratvada

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Hi winter.frost. Thank-you for your reply.

I have yearly blood tests. I think I am due in Spring time. I want my cholesterol back to normal or low by then. Also blood sugars etc. I have ordered some soya milk, it is fortified as you say. I am feeling confident and optimistic. I am going to try and get it right this time.

Just have to make sure I am full between meals. I am sure I will pick it up as I go along.
 
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winter.frost

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I suppose there are a few ways of going about the vegan diet. One such way is certainly to have a meal plan, but another is just to eat in abundance when you need it - but to do that you have to avoid certain foods and gravitate towards HCLF (high carbohydrate, low fat) whole foods for it to work well. I try to eat one raw meal a day (usually a huge bowl of salad for lunch, which can be made more exciting than it sounds).

If you're worried about not feeling full, then large portions of low calorie density food is a good idea. Raw food tends to fit the bill here. Or, constant grazing. The trouble with set meals is feeling the size of your stomach go up and down which can leave one feeling hungry - and looking wistfully at the clock because it's not yet 'meal time'.

But yes, I'm sure you'll get into the swing of it! We're here to help.
 
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bratvada

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Thanks for the link about the schizophrenic girl. I also have voices - it is the worst thing for me. If the vegan diet helps me it will be a bonus. I am not expecting it to cure me, but it should improve my physical health.

I will get a better idea of how it is working when I start proper.
 

ironenergy

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I was simply going to walk more. Instead I am going to go back to vegan.

If you're interested in eating healthier, I suggest reading the works of dietitians who specialise in vegan diets. There are a couple of vegan dietitians with websites that will help you with vegan nutrition. These are VeganHealth.org and TheVeganRD.com. Check out the tips for new vegans and the daily recommendations page. The food guide for vegans is also a good place to start.

Notice that there is no "raw" food group or recommended intake of raw foods. It's just food with nutrients that you want. But there are reasons to avoid eating mostly or entirely raw. There are also a number of healthy fats and Virginia Messina, also a vegan registered dietitian, has written, "The idea that we need to avoid all dietary fats, including healthful plant ones, is outdated and perhaps even harmful." As such, I recommend avoiding High Carb Low Fat (HCLF) and raw food diets and instead focusing on eating as vegan registered dietitians recommend.

There are also a couple of books you might be interested in. Vegan for Life and Becoming Vegan are written by dietitians so you can be sure you're getting reliable advice.

I would also recommend exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle, as does the NHS. More information can be found on their fitness homepage.
 
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winter.frost

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Notice that there is no "raw" food group or recommended intake of raw foods. It's just food with nutrients that you want. But there are reasons to avoid eating mostly or entirely raw. [...] and Virginia Messina, also a vegan registered dietitian, has written, "The idea that we need to avoid all dietary fats, including healthful plant ones, is outdated and perhaps even harmful." As such, I recommend avoiding High Carb Low Fat (HCLF) and raw food diets and instead focusing on eating as vegan registered dietitians recommend.

I have to disagree with you here.

You make it sound like eating raw foods is quack. It isn't. I'm just as sceptical and science-based as the next person, but I also know how woefully ignorant and 'behind' healthcare is when it comes to proper nutrition awareness. I ask you, most simply suggest that 5 portions of veg are enough in any given day.

This is a really useful resource (featuring interviews with medical professionals and addressing raw foods). The latest video (scroll to the bottom) is particularly pertinent: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmIqdlomtuSsICa2L9VnBVe8OFrxHCRKL

It's a pertinent topic when the team behind Cowspiracy are now onto their next film venture, What the Health. Just as the mainstream medical profession is behind about veganism, we must also consider that even worse might be said for being behind raw veganism or HCLF veganism. Orthorexia can be found in almost any 'diet' which is why many, as well as here on the vegan forum, we try to promote a balanced view about lifestyle and not just diet. This is why we have banned the advertising of diet pills, water loss pills, fat loss burners and any other such euphemism here on this site. We do take our advice seriously here on Vegan Forum which is why the staff tend to be well-read and open minded to new studies as they arrive no matter our preconceptions.

Personally, I am not a raw vegan. I do, however, eat HCLF. I don't consider raw foods to be food in its 'natural state', and many raw foodists would concur (hence the trend towards Raw Til Four). We try to promote listening to one's body and what it needs (since it can be quite vocal in its own way!). The article you provide on veganhealth.org illustrates what happened to an orthorexic who did not listen to his body cravings for cooked food. It's not the first time I've heard of that happening as I have witnessed vegans get ill by eating gazpacho in the cold winter months. However in this instance I have recommended eating raw foods (but not a raw food diet, note the difference) for those who like to eat lots and feel full. It's also incredibly difficult to excess with fibre.

Incorporating some raw foods into one's diet helps to promote wholesome eating. There can be no doubt that there are many ways to eat an unhealthy vegan diet of processed foods. Consciously thinking about raw foods can help with this. Then again, if the diet is also wholesome and cooked that's fine too. It just helps with the awareness.

Bok Choi, which can be eaten raw, is a perfectly adequate raw source of calcium if anyone is wondering. There are plenty of others too. Raw foodism, like any diet, requires planning. Poor planning might result in any kind of deficiency. It's also practically impossible to get a protein deficiency as a raw vegan as even the fruit mostly consumed contains the percentage of protein required in a given day.

Take Freelee and Durianrider as an example. Both were raw foodists until they realised the importance of cooked foods as well. For this reason they were expelled from the Woodstock Fruit Festival but, in return, they began the raw til four movement which represents a healthy HCLF balance. Ever since, there has been a general trend away from pure raw foodism, such as with The Full Helping. Meanwhile there is no literature to suggest that incorporating raw foods into a vegan diet is bad in any way.

Another good resource: http://www.thewoodstockfruitfestival.com/video/video

So I just wanted to clarify my thoughts in light of your post which I think might not be helpful if it turns people away from raw foods altogether. We are not opposed to fats at all (I agree there are healthy fats) and there are many raw fats that can be enjoyed anyway. But HCLF isn't HCNF, if you see what I mean. We promote finding what is best and listening to what the body needs, if that's cooked or fully raw we try to promote responsibility. This post covers this controversial issue even within the remit of veganism. Check out this video in the same breath. I have also uploaded my own blood test results to this end and would encourage others, when in doubt, to get checked.

 
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