US Ethical Insect Farm?

abemichael

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Hello Vegan Forum! Happy to be here with my first post. I am a product design student in university here in the US. I was wondering if anyone has experience eating/farming their own insects?

I am also currently circulating a short survey, those who participate will be entered into a drawing to win a $100 prepaid visa gift card: Food Survey

I'm curious to hear some thoughts on this from the vegan community. I've seen this topic discussed in other threads, but never the idea of raising them yourself, where you can assure ethical farming practices (which turn out to be relatively easy for insects). Thanks everybody! : )
 
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abemichael

abemichael

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True, insects are not part of a vegan diet. But assuming most of us are vegans for ethical reasons, then I think these conversations are appropriate here. From an ethical perspective, it seems like more of a gray area. It's counterintuitive, but replacing soy protein with insect protein in a diet could be argued as more ethical. To produce 1lb of soy protein, a significant amount of insects are killed through the use of pesticides, not to mention other critters like rabbits, mice and voles that make their homes in farm fields. Insect farming could actually lead to an agricultural future with less animal death vs pure veganism.

I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on this silva.

PS Thanks for the reply! :)
 

Lou

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I think the main thing is that insects getting killed while farming crops falls in to the category of incidental or accidental deaths.

Insects killed for food clearly falls into the category of intentional or deliberate.

It is sort of the difference between involuntary manslaughter and premeditated murder.
 
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abemichael

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Hi Lou, thanks for the reply! I'm curious how the premeditated vs manslaughter comparison applies? Killing insects chemically with pesticides appears to cause a slower death vs methods used in commercial insect farming. Whether or not it is intentional, insect farming could lead to less overall death and suffering for the insects in the wild (which also serve essential ecosystem functions like pollination) and also prevent these, "accidental," deaths- which are deemed acceptable. What makes the farmed insects lives more valuable than the wild ones?

Thanks Lou!
 
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silva

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True, insects are not part of a vegan diet. But assuming most of us are vegans for ethical reasons, then I think these conversations are appropriate here. From an ethical perspective, it seems like more of a gray area. It's counterintuitive, but replacing soy protein with insect protein in a diet could be argued as more ethical. To produce 1lb of soy protein, a significant amount of insects are killed through the use of pesticides, not to mention other critters like rabbits, mice and voles that make their homes in farm fields. Insect farming could actually lead to an agricultural future with less animal death vs pure veganism.

I'd be curious to hear your thoughts on this silva.

PS Thanks for the reply! :)
I see where you're going with this---gaslighting those interested in pursuing a vegan lifestyle by getting them to feel it's not as ethical as it seems. Provide opportunities for alternative foods that more than likely won't go anywhere, but sure will distract them from thinking beans are a better food than bugs. Well, how many people really want to eat bugs, so .... beef.

Why do I think this? Because anyone who was honest about eliminating insect deaths, improving environmental quality, would focus on how to change the farming process rather than suggest a profitable alternative that involves exploiting an exaggerated problem.

The very core of veganism is to NOT exploit anyone. Your solution is 100% antithetical to that goal.

There already exists ways of farming that completely circumvent traditional methods.
If you had ANY concern for insects you be asking about vertical, indoor, hydroponics- Not a way to intentionally breed, confine, kill and package insects--which is far more trauma than any environmental risk. I know the breeding that goes on for the pet industry. It isn't pretty, but who really cares about crickets or meal worms? Thinking of the amount of production just to feed small reptiles--and you're questioning food for humans? :rofl:. Yes, I see a troll!

Options --
1. Advance the idea of meatless diets. You automatically decrease the need to feed the animals raised for food
2. Change farming methods

 

veganator12

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Its definitely an interesting Question, I also got asked several times! Since for me the main reason to become vegan was the ethical one, I wouldnt kill or eat any other living being unless I really have to survive on it (even then I am not 100% sure that I would do it).
I have almost the same view like @Lou cause the intention is what counts! Also I think if there are possibilities to avoid all of what comes industrial farming (pesticides, poison etc.) every vegan would support those possibilities! In the end I think running your own farm, growing your own food with natural/organic farming is the best solution!

Best
 
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Danielle

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for vegans, it's not about if the animal got the right amount of ethical treatment, vegans avoid exploiting animals. there is no "if you treat them right" wishy washy nonsense.
 
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David3

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Eating insects is popular in certain nations of African and Asia, but insect cuisine has never caught on in the United States. In contrast, veggie burgers are common menu items.
 

Tom L.

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Hello Vegan Forum! Happy to be here with my first post. I am a product design student in university here in the US. I was wondering if anyone has experience eating/farming their own insects?
They might have such experience from the time before they became vegans. I wouldn't have had any issues with eating insects before I went veg.
I'm curious to hear some thoughts on this from the vegan community. I've seen this topic discussed in other threads, but never the idea of raising them yourself, where you can assure ethical farming practices (which turn out to be relatively easy for insects). Thanks everybody! : )
If you know what the term "vegan" means, you already know what vegans think about this.

Your query would make more sense if it were directed to people who are not vegetarian. You could ask them why they eat cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys, sheep (mostly lambs- I remember having lamb chops, but my family never had mutton, for some reason), fishes, lobsters, and shrimp- but not insects. Myself, I'd rather persuade someone to go vegetarian or vegan.
 
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FlandersOD

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It's also literally easier to just go directly vegan; at-least in any environment i'm remotely familiar with, it basically seams to serve more as a crutch.
 

Calliegirl

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There are a lot of animals I could raise myself and ensure they are raised ethically, and I wouldn't eat a single one of them. Killing and eating an animal is the opposite of raising an animal ethically.
 
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