Could i eat eggs if they are laid by my own hens?

Raechel

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I am just curious if this would still be classed as veganism? I am transitioning due to my opposition to animal cruelty. If my hens lay eggs then there is no cruelty. Can anyone help with this please?
 

Harmony

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In my opinion eggs are dead baby chicken goo so I can't really understand the desire to eat that. That being said, no one can tell you what is right for you. It is all up to you and what you are comfortable living with.
 

Connie

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In my opinion eggs are dead baby chicken goo so I can't really understand the desire to eat that
Rhetorical question: I don't wish to debate this but how do you deal with human sex? You are killing the potential for human life each and every time. Perhaps we should either ban men from having.... Your argument is uneducated and ill informed. Eggs are produced by poultry full stop. They still have to be fertilised to even stand a tiny chance of ever becoming a chick. No different from humans producing a child.

If my hens lay eggs then there is no cruelty
It is one question that comes up time and time again.

Fact: there is no potential for a chick to form if the egg is not fertilised.
Fact: even if you have a rooster, there is no guarantee an egg has been fertilised assuming rooster is fertile.
Fact: even if the egg is fertilised, very few eggs actually make it to being a live chick due to all sorts of circumstances including the broody, the rooster, food, temperature, humidity, etc
Fact: a fertilised egg must be 'set' by the broody (or human using an incubator) within 7 days of being lain, 10 days at the very outside.
Fact: very specific circumstances need to be met and maintained during the 21 day incubation period for an egg to produce a live chick either by broody or by humans in said incubator.

I, too, have my own chickens, including a rooster. I live rurally. They free range, some are rescues from egg farms including free range (don't kid yourselves about conditions being better, they are but they are still awful imo), some are end of breeding life from breeders and 2 are this year's chicks from one such chicken who went broody and I let nature take its course.

I have taken the time to learn about fertility in hens eggs unlike a lot of other so called vegans.

I describe myself as vegan plus eggs.
I have no issues eating eggs from my own chickens.
I won't eat caged hens eggs.
I'm also only eat eggs from free range meeting certain minimum conditions regarding hens like maximum number of chickens per acre etc. Industry standards are appalling and access to daylight and/or soil equally so.

My chickens are spoilt rotten, well taken care of and most over 3 years old, several over 6 yrs including the one who went broody on me.

I see the 'issue' as little different to a vegan keeping any other pet, re-using wool or actually using plastic or fuel in their lives (origin being crude oil and hardly great for the planet). The wool issue being wool is far more environmentally friendly and very long lived (decades) compared to synthetic alternatives derived from crude oil! Be environmentally friendly and you'll also get slated for it.

I still use woollen jumpers, socks, gloves, hats etc. I purchased them more than 2 decades ago well before I became vegan. I'm told by some I'm not vegan because I still use them. I should apparently destroy them to prevent others from using them according to some other vegans and use synthetic clothing derived from crude oil....

At the end of the day, it is your choice.

I have made mine. I'm veggan not vegan when it comes to my own chickens.
 

Sally

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I read on this forum that they are a hen's period, so eugh! But I don't think you can eat anything that has been in or part of an animal and be vegan.
 

Sally

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Clothing made from crude oil is another matter and can be difficult to address without a lot of research, which I will try to do.

Vegan means not eating or using anything the comes from an animal. So, eggs, wool and honey are not vegan. However, if people want to eat eggs that fine, but those who do are not vegan, and if they call themselves vegan and publicly eat eggs they are misrepresenting those of us who are trying to be true vegans.