Any opinions on consuming purslane?

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Plant Muncher

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I read an article on the minerals and vitamins purslane contains and I wonder if anyone here has ever used it much in their food. It grows in most backyards and gardens as a weed. I had a tomato plant that suffered a fatal case of water wilt and when I called it by pulling it out root and branch, there was one little purslane plant growing underneath. The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away I guess.

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Kaliopy

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I use it in my salads when I can find it fresh....I like the lemony flavor of it. Seems I also read it has some B vitamins, but I may have dreamt that!
 
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I use it in my salads when I can find it fresh....I like the lemony flavor of it. Seems I also read it has some B vitamins, but I may have dreamt that!
Cool! The only downside seems to be with the formation of kidney stones.
 

GTing

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Cool! The only downside seems to be with the formation of kidney stones.

Kidney stones are a fear for me (thankfully I never got them before though) as I hear they're so painful that they're supposed to be equivalent to the pain of giving birth (or so I've read), it's why I avoid spinach and kale. Any idea where it ranks in comparison to those two?
 
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Kidney stones are a fear for me (thankfully I never got them before though) as I hear they're so painful that they're supposed to be equivalent to the pain of giving birth (or so I've read), it's why I avoid spinach and kale. Any idea where it ranks in comparison to those two?
I've passed them more than once. I can assure you that they are like no pain I have ever been through. BUT, having said that, I understand that if you boil purslane, it removes the chemicals that causes kidney stones.

A Final Word of Caution: The only potential downside that researchers have found about purslane is the relatively high content of oxalic acid, which can exacerbate the formation of oxalates in the body, which are what make kidney stones. If you already suffer from kidney stones, avoiding purslane might be a good idea. However, boiling purslane down in water causes a great deal of oxalic acid to be eliminated, without losing many of the other beneficial nutrients.

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/vegetable/purslane.html
 
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Health Benefits Of Purslane
Purslane has many benefits that help in preventing and curing diseases. Some of the benefits include:

Heart Health: In terms of boosting the strength of your cardiovascular system, purslane can help in a variety of ways. Most notably, researchers were shocked when they saw the very high levels of omega-3 fatty acids in purslane, at levels higher than in some fish oils, which are widely considered the best source for these beneficial fatty acids. Omega-3s help to reduce the amount of “bad” cholesterol in the body and promote a healthier cholesterol balance in our bloodstream. Consuming foods that are high in omega-3s has been shown to significantly reduce cardiovascular disease, as well as atherosclerosis, thereby preventing heart attacks and strokes. Furthermore, the potassium found in purslane can reduce blood pressure due to its behavior as a vasodilator, meaning that it relaxes blood vessels and reduces strain on the heart.

Weight Loss Aid: Purslane is very low in calories, but it is nutrient-rich and packed with dietary fiber. This means that people can feel full after a meal of purslane, but they won’t necessarily up their calorie intake by very much, thereby helping people who are struggling to lose weight or maintain their diets.

Child Development: Although research is still ongoing, early studies have shown that high levels of omega-3s in young children have resulted in a decrease in certain developmental disorders, including autism, ADHD, and other issues that affect millions of children across the world.

Gastrointestinal Diseases: Some people may shy away from alternative medicine treatments for their various health conditions, but in traditional Chinese medicine, purslane was widely used to treat everything from diarrhea and intestinal bleeding to hemorrhoids and dysentery. While most Western medicine wouldn’t confirm these findings, purslane (known as Ma Chi Xian in Chinese medicine) is still used to this day for a wide variety of intestinal conditions. These benefits are mainly attributed to the presence of so many beneficial organic compounds found in purslane, including dopamine, malic acid, citric acid, alanine, glucose, and many others.

Skin Conditions: Along with gastrointestinal issues, purslane can treat a wide variety of skin conditions as well. The high levels of vitamin A, combined with the cocktail of compounds found in this “weed” mean that it can help to reduce inflammation on bee stings and snake bites when applied topically, but can also boost the healthy appearance of the skin, reduce wrinkles, and stimulate healing of skin cells to remove scars and blemishes when consumed.

Cancer Prevention: One of the most widespread and tragic diseases in the world today is cancer, so any anti-carcinogenic food item is highly praised. Purslane has significant levels of vitamin C and vitamin A, both of which act as antioxidants to prevent certain cancers, specifically lung and oral cancers. However, purslane also contains betalain pigment compounds, which give the plant its distinctive yellow and red coloring. Beta-cyanins and beta-xanthins have been directly connected with anti-mutagenic effects in the body, meaning that they prevent free radicals from causing mutations in healthy cells, thereby helping to prevent the development of cancer.

Vision Booster: Vitamin A and beta-carotene have both been connected to eye health and vision for many years. Purslane can help to prevent macular degeneration and cataracts by eliminating free radicals that attack the cells of the eye and cause these commonly age-related diseases.

Strong Bones: The range of minerals present in purslane make it a healthy choice for people who want to protect their bones. Calcium, magnesium, iron, and manganese are all elements required to develop bone tissue and speed the healing process of the bones in our body. This can help you prevent osteoporosis, a common age-related condition that affects millions of people.

Improved Circulation: The high content of iron and copper in purslane mean that it will stimulate the production of red blood cells. Both of these minerals are essential for boosting circulation, which means more oxygen being delivered to essential parts of the body, increased healing speed of cells and organs, increased hair growth, and a general improvement of metabolic efficiency!
 

bEt

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I regularly enjoy purslane. Also chickweed, which is also called starflower and should be eaten in moderation because it contains saponins which can cause digestive upset, and is better mixed with other foods anyway since frankly it tastes a lot like dirt! In warmer climates it may be possible to find a vine called Anredera cordifolia.
 

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I eat purslane from my garden, either raw or cooked. I like it, and I think I've also heard of its omega-3 fatty acid content. (I also chow down on spinach and kale- as well as a weedy relative of spinach which tastes a lot like spinach: lamb's-quarters.)

I read the comment about oxalic acid and kidney stones in one of the above articles. I'm sure it's just my imagination, but I suddenly feel a very slight twinge in the area of my kidneys...